• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Dramatic significance of Alfieri as a character and a narrator in 'A View from the Bridge'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What is the dramatic significance of Alfieri as a character and a narrator in 'A View from the Bridge' ? Alfieri was born an Italian, but for the past twenty-five years or so he's been an American. He is the symbolic bridge between American law and tribal laws that the title of the play refers to. It seems that these two cultures and their ideas of right and wrong are at war inside him : he respects American law, but is still loyal to Italian customs. The view from the bridge is Alfieri's view point in the story, between the two communities which we find in the story. ...read more.

Middle

When Eddie and Marco duel in order to regain their honor, they're adhering to a much older law, the tribal laws of Italy. Alfieri isn't very active in the play. Ha introduces the audience to the world of the play and the protagonist, he advises Eddie to let Catherine make her own decisions, he bails Marco and Rodolfo out of jail andhe concludes the play with a lamentation for Eddie. For the entire play, Alfieri seems to be on the side of American law and he is the voice of reason. When Eddie first comes to him for help, Alfieri tells him, "You have no recourse in the law". There's nothing illegal about Catherine and Rodolfo's relationship and Alfieri advises Eddie to let Catherine live her own life. ...read more.

Conclusion

This really shows that Alfieri is stuck in the middle. This play is a Greek tragedy. Greek tragdies often have a chorus, and In A View from the Bridge, Miller uses Alfieri as the chorus. In Athens, the chorus made comments on the action of story and Alfieri does the same thing. In between scenes, he connects the play with larger moral and societal implications. Alfieri does a lot of talking about the contrasting Italian and American ideas of justice.The chorus's sympathy was the audience's window into the horrific events of the play. While Alfieri doesn't make a big show of his sorrow, he comments several times on how terrible everything that goes down is. He even ends the play by telling the audience that he mourns Eddie. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Arthur Miller section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Arthur Miller essays

  1. 'ALFIERI: And now we are quite civilized, quite American. Now we settle for half, ...

    Even though Eddie has tried many things to try and get rid of Rodolpho there is a short scene at the end of act one when Eddie sort of teaches Rodolpho how to box, but this is really to show that Eddie is superior to Rodolpho, this could possibly scare Rodolpho.

  2. Examine the Ideas of Manliness, Hostility and Aggression in 'A View from the Bridge'. ...

    This is reflected by in numerous circumstances, including when Eddie refuses to acknowledge him but he continues his conversation and makes attempts to talk to him. Along with Eddie, other Longshoremen are quite amused by Rodolpho's appearance and personality. The too also find him to be strange, not a proper man.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work