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Dreams in ‘Death of a Salesman’.

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Dreams are part of any man's nature. To dream is to live a life that you hope for yourself in the future. These dreams may or may not be achievable but will always drive people toward them. People may take these dreams seriously like Willy Loman; but to most people to achieve their dreams would be to achieve the impossible. Dreams can be very dangerous if they are the only driving forces behind a person's life and lead them, not to hope but to want for things beyond their reach. This is the case in 'Death of a Salesman'. The driving force behind Willy Loman throughout the Death of a Salesman, is the idea that he can achieve the "American Dream". He wants to have the material things in life and to have the best of everything; he wants lots of money, a big house, and a loving family and, "To come out the number-one man". He sees Ben as the epitome of success, he longs to be as successful as Ben or even as successful as Bernard, always asking "What's the secret?" ...read more.


They wholly subscribe to the American Dream A major part of the play is the time that Willy spends living in the past - daydreaming and reminiscing. He is constantly revisiting the parts of his life that have shaped him to the person that he is. In this way the audience unravels the story of Biff's childhood, Ben's success and Willy's affair with 'The Woman'. This seems to be the part of his life he most regrets, as it is the time he revisits the most. At several moments throughout the play, 'The Woman's laughter is heard from offstage, usually at times that Willy sees what has become of his life, for example when he sees Linda mending her stockings. These flashbacks are played out to the audience like scenes in real life and often simultaneously - they are only indicated by the actions of the actors. During dream sequences, the actors pass through the boundaries of the walls as though acting on a completely different stage, but during sequences in the present the actors obey the imaginary lines of the walls, entering and leaving through the doors. ...read more.


Linda merely encourages. She is contented to live with Willy even if they have no garden or the car breaks down or the fridge fails. Arthur Miller seems to see her, not Ben, as the real hero of the play. This is reflected in the gentle respect he gives to her in his writing. This play is a strong message against the principle of the "American Dream". Willy Loman is constantly striving to achieve the dream, but drives himself crazy. Biff seems to be the only character in the Loman family that is able to set himself aside from this dream, wanting only to be happy - his own man. Although I believe dreams to be an important, if not essential part of life, I also believe that contentment is far more important. If you cannot be happy with what you have, you cannot possibly hope to be happy with what you wish for. Willy Loman dreams of becoming a great man, dreams of the great man he was and dreams of the great man Biff can be, he just fails to realise that they are great men. The Importance Of Dreams In Death Of A Salesman Andrew MacKay 10S ...read more.

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