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Edward Scissorhands - From the director Tim Burton comes an incredible tale of an unusual character.

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Introduction

Chris Sayers 10JO English Edward Scissorhands From the director Tim Burton comes an incredible tale of an unusual character. Edward, stricken to life with scissors for hands, finds himself centre of attention for all the wrong reasons after being found by an Avon Lady in his dim, gloomy castle, and taken to a pastel paradise known as suburbia. Childlike Theme Almost immediately we are introduced to the childlike theme in this story through the altering of the 20th Century Fox symbol. The snow and silver-like lighting block out any traces of a golden, bright environment, which we are used to seeing in the regular 20th Century Fox symbol. And this use of cold, dark lighting is unusual as we often associate child's play with bright, happy colours such as yellow, orange or green. The camera now switches to a tracking shot up the stairs of the castle and suggests that we, the viewers, are sneaking in. All the while, soft and childlike music is playing in the background and this increases the childish atmosphere and creates a calm, slow pace. We now see a collection of cookies ranging from animals to hearts and stars to little men; possibly children. These cookies could be letting us know a little something about Edward. Perhaps the hearts mean that even though he is a robot, he still has a heart and is loving and caring. And the children could be signifying that Edwards mind is not like a grown-up's. ...read more.

Middle

American Dream Theme When the tracking shot reveals Edward for the first time, we see the town through his eyes. By no means is his view of the town the "American Dream". Looking out of his dilapidated mansion, he sees nothing but a big lonely world. Immediately after Edward's view of the town, the picture changes from a dark town to a very bright, colourful one. But I think that the inhabitants of this town are trying to hide behind a colourful exterior. I think that they know all is not well and that they know something or someone is up there. One thing that accents the American Dream is the Avon Lady and her unsuccessful persuasion skills towards potential buyers. She is trying (unsuccessfully) to sell the female ideal and she thinks that it is her duty to brighten up people's lives, and this is how she ends up helping Edward. Being an Avon Lady, Peg feels that if everything looks pretty and cheerful, then everything is pretty and cheerful. Also, seeing as her job is to sell people material goods to help "cover up the bad" there is even more of an incentive to improve the castle. But when Peg finally gets up to the castle, she can't believe her eyes. No longer can she see the run-down exterior of the castle, all she can see is the beautifully crafted hedge statues that are lined with radiant, elegant flowers. All of which are juxtaposed to the dilapidated castle. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the snowy scenes, Burton has managed to create a darker, sadder atmosphere. This is because the opening credits we see the many aspects of Edward's life and Burton is trying to explain to us that Edward is a sad person and therefore nearly all colour is blocked out. However, once Edward has disappeared off screen, the scene changes to very bright, luminous colours. The reason for this being that everyone in this town feels their lives are happy and bright, but are they? One woman's life is so boring, she is trying to have an affair with the repairman. And another woman looks as if Christianity owns her life. Another aspect of this "happy, bright life" is the Avon Lady going door-to-door to try and sell her cosmetic goods. As her job is "selling beauty" it was Peg's natural instinct to try and bright up the dilapidated abode that is Edward's home. But when she finally gets up to Edward's castle she is astounded. She cannot believe that someone could look the way Edward does and not be helped. But no matter what anyone looks like, looks are deceiving and not everything is what it seems. And that is exactly the case with Edward. Even though he looks dangerous, he is very scared and harmless. In conclusion, Burton has managed to create five different themes in the first twenty minutes, which carry on for the rest of the film and complement each other perfectly. During the first twenty minutes or so, we have been not only introduced to Edward but we have been introduced to his past, surroundings and what was to be his new home for most of the film. ...read more.

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