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"Enduring Love" Questions

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Introduction

In "Enduring Love" by Ian McEwan, the relationship between Joe and Jed is the most compelling aspect of the novel. Do you agree? The plot of 'Enduring Love' would not have turned so interesting without the relationship of Joe and Jed. This relationship is definitely the most compelling aspect of the novel 'Enduring Love'. The role played by Jed Parry is very significant in creating the effects of psychological thriller in the novel. Jed's psychological disorder, de Clerambault's syndrome has been utilized by McEwan to create an interest niche to the plot. It is under the evil affect of this disorder that Jed creates havoc in the lives of Joe and Clarissa. The relationship between Joe and Jed creates the ground for testing the love and in-depth understanding between Joe and Clarissa. Though the reader considers Jed as the negative character in the plot, yet there is a realization that without her the plot would not have grown. ...read more.

Middle

They represented the sense of obsessive love and split personality in individual. Joe always loved Clarissa, but he was also much attracted by Jed sensuous image. He may not have loved Jed but definitely desired her. Jed got this message very clear and thus tried to make her space in Joe's life. She threatens Clarissa and adds all kinds of nuisance to their relationship. It is the craftsmanship of McEwan that makesthis subplot so interesting and grasping for the reader. Without this relationship between Joe and Jed the novel would not have been so engrossing. In "Enduring Love", how does McEwan tell the story in Chapter 10? With first person narrative style in Chapter 10, 'Firelight and stars so bright...' of "Enduring Love" by McEwan, there is a personal touch to the story. With phrases like "fire-grilled fish straight off a banana leaf" the narration adds the touch of country to the plot. There is a continuity of self realization. ...read more.

Conclusion

McEwan is very simple with his narrative techniques. He makes the reader feel the transparency in the language. Use of metaphor and satire are his forte and it helps in making this chapter very attractive. As the characters converse there is a continuous shift from the level of friendship to hardcore sensuous attractiveness. However, the author adds some elements of stoppage to give privilege to the idea of 'emotional justice'. Though he encourages the thematic approach of 'unconditional love' he never leaves any stone unturned to justify the demands of human moral expectations. This can be found in the words I wanted to feel his lips moving against mine in a sinful way. There are strong impacts of serious languages in the Chapter. As the title suggests 'Firelight and stars so bright...', McEwan adds the elements of firelights in his characters. The issues of passion, physical attractions and hardcore sensuous love are used in a very direct way. Though McEwan used metaphors to declare natural beauties, he leaves natural instincts to come in a raw way. This is the charm of McEwan's narration, that makes the reader feel the 'firelight' inside in a metaphoric way. ...read more.

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