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English A View From The Bridge

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Introduction

James Bevan English - [Last scene] How does Arthur Miller create a dramatic last scene in 'A View from the Bridge'. The final scene of this play is the climax of a series of events that 'A View from the Bridge' has been subtly foreshadowing from the very beginning. Continually throughout the play a fusion of moods and feelings are created which adds to the significance of the final scene. Everything that has been predicted in Act 1 comes full circle. There are several elements of 'A View from the Bridge' that resemble Greek structure. Eddie is the character who is vulnerable in his own terrible fate. Secondly like Greek tragedy it is all situated in on place-in and around Eddie's home. Alfieri explains to the audience in the beginning what is going to occur. The audience wants to find out how so there is still interest and curiosity. Eddie is the hero of the play. He makes moves that are courageous and unexpected of his standard of living and temperament. The one main difference about the play and Greek tragedy does not use ordinary people whereas 'A View from the Bridge' does. There are six main roles in the play and they are, Eddie, Catherine, Beatrice, Marco, Rodolfo and Alfieri. Eddie is an Italian American; he lives with Catherine and Beatrice and is the leader of the family circle. ...read more.

Middle

Now the audience are prepared for the conflict ahead and this again adds more tension to build up to the last scene. Early on Arthur Miller shows us there is a happy family living in a close knit community. Beatrice clarifies this in a conversation with Eddie and Catherine: Beatrice: - (there are tears in her eyes; she turns to Catherine) you see what he is? (She turns and grabs Eddie's face in her hands.) Mmm! You're an angel! God'll bless you. (He is gratefully smiling.) You'll see, you'll get a blessing for this! Nevertheless this happy family starts to deteriorate as everyday life passes, 'cracks' start to appear. "...who's mad...I'm not mad...you're the one who's mad..." This quote shows that even before Rodolfo and Marco arrive there is still tension among the family members; this is then increased when they both arrive. More of this is yet to come when Marco and Rodolfo have their make-shift 'boxing match' which reminds the audience back to the words 'bloody course' that will be taking place. The ending of the play continues when Beatrice says, "You want something else, Eddie, and you can never have her!" Alfieri has been the only one to confront Eddie with his true feelings so this is a shocking and unexpected line. Alfieri has only hinted, "let her go...and bless her...somebody had to come for her sooner or later..." ...read more.

Conclusion

Gee that's hard... Marco: - here. (He kneels, grasps, and with some strain slowly raises the chair higher and higher... We are then told Eddie has a knife ,"Eddie goes down with the Marco starts to raise a foot to stomp him when Eddie springs a knife into his hand and Marco steps back..." The fact that Eddie had a knife in the first place evidently shows his passion to win this fight. Interestingly Miller puts Marco higher up on stage than Eddie, this could signify the morale levels of the two and who appears to be the most ruling. As Eddie had the knife the community look down on his in disgust as it was dirty and deceitful. Louis rushes to Eddie and screams, "Eddie for Christ sake" Eddie now realises even his best friend disapproves. To finalise the play Alfieri makes a speech, the lights go down, indicating the end. There is a sense of fate and inevitability as the play has now come to a full circle. Alfieri comments about Eddie, "for he allowed himself to be wholly known and for that I think I will love him more that all my sensible clients...and so I mourn him - I admit it - with a certain...alarm." This final speech acts like a chorus commenting on the effects of Eddie's death. All the creative techniques Miller used to build up tension were effective and gave the play such a feel in which you didn't want to put it down. A great read. ...read more.

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