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Creative Writing - Elizabeth Bennet's Diary - Part 1

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Introduction

Pride and Prejudice Part 1 Dear Diary, Tonight I left Longbourn hoping that I should have a most pleasant evening. Unfortunately my hopes were dashed in an outpouring of self-denigration by the other members of my family. Jane, of course, is the exception. I had hoped that Mr. Wickham would be present but, on arriving, I was informed by Mr. Denny that he would not be attending. His words were, "I do not imagine his business would have called him away, if he had not wished to avoid a certain gentleman." I was livid. What was my purpose in coming to Netherfield, if not to meet with Mr. Wickham? My intention for the evening, that is, to enjoy his company, and hope that he might enjoy mine, would not be realized. The disappointment this evoked in me only led to anger towards a certain Mr. Darcy, undoubtedly the "certain gentleman" Mr. Denny spoke of. Now no longer expecting an enjoyable evening, I resigned myself to informing Charlotte of my numerous grievances against Mr. Darcy. A short time later, Mr Collins approached me to claim his turn at the dances. Being an abominable dancer, he had not thought it appropriate to even attempt to learn the steps of the Boulanger, the dance we would be partaking in. ...read more.

Middle

Sir. William Lucas interrupted us to speak to Darcy, and the conversation ventured towards books, and from there towards my thoughts at that time. I then began to ask questions to ascertain his character. Darcy seemed to take some offence at this - the irony! I told him what I was merely trying to do - I believe my words were "If I do not take your likeness now, I may never have another opportunity. " To which he returned icily, "I would by no means suspend any pleasure of yours." I had just separated from him when Miss. Bingley had the audacity to try and engage me in conversation about Mr. Wickham. She told me, "...As to Mr. Darcy's using him ill, it's perfectly false. I do not know the particulars, but I know very well that Darcy is not in the least to blame.... His coming into the country at all is a most insolent thing indeed...I pity you, Miss Eliza...one could not expect much better. " I was furious at her presumptuousness. The woman knew nothing, but had only taken the word of Darcy and now parroted it as if it were absolute truth. ...read more.

Conclusion

He made a patronising comment on the soundness of my judgement before going forth to demean himself further in the presence of superior company. Mr. Darcy was shocked; yet spoke civilly, whilst his contempt rose visibly with every word Collins said. If this embarrassment were not enough, Mary had obviously decided that the Netherfield ball would be the opportune moment to exhibit her ability, or lack thereof, in playing the pianoforte. She played poorly and indeed tried to sing, completely oblivious to the disdain with which the assembled audience listened. Finally my father was forced to intervene, publicly and awkwardly, and Mary's interlude on the piano was ended. I left Netherfield tonight feeling humiliated and angry. I worry now that Jane's prospects may have been limited by the shame brought upon our family by the antics of some of its members. I am still consumed with rage on account of the remarks made by Mr. Darcy and the sycophants who follow him (namely, Caroline Bingley). Hopefully sleep will bring some peace to the tumult of emotion I am now experiencing. The mortification still smarts, but the fury, on behalf of Wickham, still burns. ...read more.

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