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Draw detailed contrast between two accounts of Darwin's killing of the fox, which you have read

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Draw detailed contrast between two accounts of Darwin's killing of the fox, which you have read Although they describe the same incident, these two texts differ not only in points of style and detail but also in terms of their respective authors' intentions. Charles Darwin, the eminent Victorian naturalist, describes his killing of the fox in his journal, which was probably aimed at a well educated audience including fellow scientists. Gitings's poem contains much more evocative language and imagery because the poet writes from a different perspective. Charles Darwin's "Voyage of the Beagle" is written as a prose text and is factual, formal, and written like a journal. In his passage he uses words like "theodolite" and "species" which suggests that the passage was aimed at a well educated audience partially his fellow scientists, as other people back then were less intelligent and wouldn't have known what those words meant. Another clue to suggest that it is meant for scientists is the use of the in parenthesis of "Canis fulvipes" which is the Latin term for a fox. ...read more.


He first begins off describing how the colour of the magnificent fox stands out from the craggy rocks of the island and then does out to personalise that fox by using "his". For example "Round his haunches the brush curled". This makes the audience feel for the animal like a human being rather than an animal. Throughout the beginning of the poem Gitings uses soft sounds like "se" sound in "ease" and "geese" to make the fox sound more innocent but when the humans arrive on the island he begins to use harsher sounds like "out" in "shout" to make the humans seem out of place and savage. At the beginning he also uses " The spear flight of a wedge of geese" symbolically, as to warn the reader of what is going to happen to the fox. Again later Gitings personalises the fox by describing the theodolite as "three-legged to their two", this makes you see the humans and their equipment through the fox's point of view and make it simple like the fox would see it. ...read more.


Yet Breeding all dilemma there. The animals of science have Invaded life. The wise and brave Are nothing or corrupted. Now The mushroom cloud begins to grow In these lines and the whole poem Gitings sees the killing of the fox as a poignant symbol for the future, because in the five lines above he explains how the human thirst for knowledge will lead us to destruction. He uses the A-bomb as an example; "the mushroom cloud begins to grow" because that is one of the dreadful things that humans have created because of knowledge. Both texts are different in many ways even though that talk about the same incident that happened. Darwin saw the incident as a triumph for mankind but Gitings saw it as the undoing of mankind so he uses everything he could to criticise Darwin and the killing of the fox. Connotation, metaphor, litotes, genre, prose text or poem text and even personification were many of the things that differed between the two poems. ...read more.

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