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GCSE: William Shakespeare

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 84
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  1. Marked by a teacher

    Throughout the play Macbeth and Lady Macbeth together demonstrate how ambition can turn a loyal soldier into a bloodthirsty murderer

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 1296
    • Submitted: 03/10/2012
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Jeff Taylor 20/05/2013
    • Awarding body: Not known/Not applicable
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Compare and contrast the images of love in: Act I Scene V, Act II Scene II and Act V Scene III

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 3527
    • Submitted: 22/03/2012
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Jeff Taylor 10/06/2013
  3. Marked by a teacher

    Is Iago The Perfect Villain?

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 3541
    • Submitted: 01/05/2011
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 24/06/2013
  4. Marked by a teacher

    Personal Responce to Hamlet

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 1062
    • Submitted: 21/03/2010
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Karen Reader 03/04/2012
  5. Marked by a teacher

    How does Lady Macbeth change throughout the play, "Macbeth"?

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 2283
    • Submitted: 16/01/2010
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 23/07/2013
  6. Marked by a teacher

    The Gender Transformation of Caesar

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 1750
    • Submitted: 20/02/2006
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Karen Reader 20/04/2012
  7. Marked by a teacher
  8. Marked by a teacher

    How Shakespeare portrays Romeo and Juliet in Act 2 Scene 2

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 2288
    • Submitted: 14/12/2012
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 06/06/2013
    • Awarding body: Not known/Not applicable
  9. Marked by a teacher
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Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • To what extent is the mechanicals’ performance of Pyramus and Thisby a success?

    "To conclude, 'The Tragedy of Pyramus and Thisby' did not succeed as a tragedy because it was poorly written and poorly acted. It did, however, work brilliantly as a comedy, even if the mechanicals did not mean it to be. If it had been successful as a tragedy, it would not have been such a success, because people want to be happy on their wedding day. Pyramus and Thisby- a successful disaster."

  • Discuss Pucks role in A Midsummer Nights Dream.

    "Puck's role is also to conclude the play with a monologue (solo address). "If we shadows have offended, ... think but this, and all is mended,... that you have but slumb'red here ... While these visions did appear. ... And this weak and idle theme,... No more yielding but a dream, ... Gentles, do not reprehend. ...If you pardon, we will mend." Finally, he says, "So, good night unto you all. ... Give me your hands, if we be friends, ... And Robin shall restore amends It ends with a restoration of human relationships. He speaks the final words at the end of the play in an attempt to make amends with the audience and apologize for the fairies behavior during the performance. Puck makes it clear that the fairies' mischief was not intended to cause harm, and that all will be set aright. Hence Puck's role is to bring peace to the play after many endless conflicts."

  • Compare the way in which Shakespeare presents Hamlet's 'antic disposition' to the way Ophelia's madness is presented to us in Act IV.

    "Having analysed the way in which Shakespeare presents Hamlets antic disposition and Ophelia's madness, I have been able to reveal some similarities and differences in the presentation. In my opinion, there is a very clear contrast between Hamlet and Ophelia. I have acquired this judgment due to the fact that Hamlet had a reason to feign madness, whereas Ophelia had no reason to be mad in craft, so her insanity was genuine and born involuntarily, while Hamlet intentionally manifested his false lunacy. This contrast allows the audience to have a better understanding of the fact that Hamlet is not really mad, but Ophelia is. Emile Khan - 1 -"

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