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In act 2, scene 2 consider how Shakespeare uses both literary and dramatic devices to heighten the tension. Does he succeed?

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Introduction

In act 2, scene 2 consider how Shakespeare uses both literary and dramatic devices to heighten the tension. Does he succeed? Act 2 scene 2 is a major scene in Macbeth. Shakespeare uses both literary and dramatic devices to heighten the tension. In my opinion he does succeed. Act 2 Scene 2 is based in the middle of the night after Macbeth has killed King Duncan; he is walking down the corridors of the castle with daggers in his hands with the king's blood on them and himself. Lady Macbeth tries to sort Macbeth out as he is mentally and physically ill over the crime he has committed, which is the worst crime that could ever be done. The killing of the King. Shakespeare uses many different dramatic devices to heighten and increase the tension in Macbeth. Shakespeare uses a very dramatic setting which is the castle. Shakespeare sets it out as a gloomy castle letting us know that something is about to happen. ...read more.

Middle

Shakespeare uses this when a person knocks on the castle gate; this brings in the audience, making them fully realize what has happened. This makes the audience think and also shocks Macbeth. Religion used to be a major thing when Macbeth was first written. Shakespeare uses this when Macbeth says 'Amen', this is known and related to religion, showing us that everyone believes in religion and that it means a lot to the people. Shakespeare uses this to show to us that murder matters a lot more due to the religion of the people, this gives more tension throughout the play. The most important dramatic device that Shakespeare has is interaction, this is very important as it shows the characters of the play interacting with each other; it lets the audience know what is going on. These are the dramatic devices that Shakespeare uses in act 2 scene 2 of Macbeth to bring in tension. ...read more.

Conclusion

This literary device adds tension into the play from this hyperbole to add dramatic affect. Personification is another literary device that Shakespeare has used to bring in tension. Personification is used to make an object sound like a human. Shakespeare has used this when he states 'owl, cry, shrieked, crickets cry'. Shakespeare has used this to make them sound as if they were humans because owls and crickets do not cry and Shakespeare has used this to add more effect by giving the animals human characteristics. The last literary affect that Shakespeare uses is symbol. This represents something that the audience is aware about. For example the cross is represented as God. In act 2 scene 2 Shakespeare uses an owl to represent death. This brings in a lot of tension into the audience and makes them aware that something is about to happen. These are the literary devices that Shakespeare uses in act 2 scene 2 of Macbeth to bring in tension. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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