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The Battle Of Blenheim & The Charge Of The Light Brigade Comparison

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Introduction

Comparing Poems. The Charge Of The Light Brigade & The Battle Of Blenheim. In this essay, i will be comparing 2 poems. The First is The Charge Of The Light Brigade by Alfred Lord Tennyson. The Second is The Battle Of Blenheim, (1774-1843) written by Robert Southey. I will be comparing both the poet's views on war are, and how they convey this through their writting,with use of language, structure, devices and/or imagery. The Battle of Blenheim and The Charge of the Light Brigade both question the point of war and show the horror of battle. One does it through the eyes of child helping us to question war and the other uses the energy and heroism of the cavalry in a tragic and futile battle.Both poems are ballads. This form is used to tell the story of war. Like the majoroty of storys, there is a message at the end. I think Southey's message is that we sometimes believe the myth of war and celebrate famous victories without really understanding why war takes place. ...read more.

Middle

It tells the story of the six hundred men who charged to their inevitable death in a battle in the Crimean War. The men were acting on wrong orders and their tragic story shows us that war is futile. They could not nor would not have wanted to question the orders, 'theirs not to reason why, theirs but to do and die.' Although Tennyson shows disbelief that the men had to charge into the 'mouth of hell' he does not blame the brave soldiers, the 'noble six hundred.' Instead he thinks we should 'honour the charge they made'. This poem both celebrates and questions the men of war. The way both poems are structured is very similar, they are both tightly structured into small paragraphs consisting of short lines, (this is a typical charictaristic of ballads/poems). The Battle Of Blenheim is made up of paragraphs containing 6 short sentances. This is consistant throughout the poem. Where-as The Charge of the Light Brigade varys. ...read more.

Conclusion

Rather than being rich with goodness, and offering a home inviroment like it does now to Kaspar and his family, the land was stripped of its goodness, an ravaged by war at that time. Alfred Tennyson also captures this brutal vision of war. He uses the metaphor "valley of Death" to gives the idea that death was inevitable. He evokes the sound of war to add to the image "to right of them, to left of them, in front of them" to capture the over-powering noise of the cannons bombarding the men. He describes bodies as "shattered and sundered" and "stormed at with shot and shell." The alliteration here emphasises the constant noise of battle and the men's impossible position. The word "stormed" also suggests chaos and violence. Tennyson's use of onomatopoeic words, 'volleyed and thundered', adds to the overall effect of a harsh landscape of war. In conclusion, these two poems vividly capture the tragedy of war: men die, buildings burn, and it brings nothing but chaos. Both poems also suggest that people often remember the names of wars or battles but forget the reality of how things really are at war. Maddison Couzens ...read more.

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