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GCSE: George Orwell

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1984 (112)
Animal Farm (333)
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  • Marked by Teachers essays 8
  • Peer Reviewed essays 39
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  1. Marked by a teacher

    How does Orwell use the fable form to explore ideas about power in Animal Farm?

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 1188
    • Submitted: 22/05/2012
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 29/05/2013
  2. Marked by a teacher

    How does Major seek to persuade the animals in chapter one of Animal Farm?

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 1085
    • Submitted: 11/11/2008
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 29/05/2013
  3. Marked by a teacher

    Who is the hero of Animal Farm?

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 2027
    • Submitted: 03/06/2005
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 29/05/2013
  4. Marked by a teacher
  5. Marked by a teacher

    How Does Napoleon Take and Maintain Control Of Animal Farm?

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 823
    • Submitted: 13/10/2004
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 29/05/2013
  6. Marked by a teacher

    Animal Farm - Snowball's Diary

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 2147
    • Submitted: 22/09/2004
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 29/05/2013
  7. Marked by a teacher

    The Rain Horse-Diary Extract.

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 924
    • Submitted: 13/10/2003
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Laura Gater 29/05/2013
  8. Peer reviewed
  9. Peer reviewed

    Animal Farm

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 1263
    • Submitted: 06/12/2007
    • Reviewed by: (?) sydneyhopcroft 15/03/2012
  10. Peer reviewed

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Compare the presentation of power and stability in '1984' and 'Brave New World'.

    "In conclusion, Orwell and Huxley create very contrasting societies; one being dark, depressed and tyrannical, while the other is oppressive yet seems to have a very pleasant environment. However, through many similar and different ways the governments of the worlds achieve very similar goals of controlling their constituents through their power, thus strengthening their power and maintaining long-term stability."

  • Compare similarities and differences in two fictional stories; "The Red Room" by H.G. Wells and extracts from "1984" by George Orwell and Winston's experiences in the "Room 101".

    "The Room 101's fear is that of something real, a natural fear that cannot be overcome despite what he may try (rats in Winston's case). Therefore again pushing his mind to all fearful conclusions. "The Red Room" was set in the present, yet "1984" is set in the future. This difference may imply that the authors adopt different writing p"

  • Although 'Animal Farm' is written as a fable to what extent could it be looked at as a comment on human behaviour?

    "So in conclusion the answer to the question is yes it is possible to see the story of animal farm as a comment on human behaviour. I believe this because Orwell described all the animals in the story with terms we use to describe the behaviour of other people for example "benevolent","wise", " motherly" and "foolish". It is probably easy to see that that book dose describe the animals to be an easer way to comment on the human ways of life. If we changed all the animals to people and made the story relevant it would be very hard to think about what goes on in the story for example the battle of the windmill where all those animals were killed, and when Napoleon has lots of the animals killed in front of the other animals."

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