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GCSE: Robert Louis Stevenson

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  • Peer Reviewed essays 7
  1. How does Stevenson explore good and evil through the characters of Jekyll and Hyde?

    The phrase ?well-made? has a double meaning, suggesting both physical masculinity and wealth, a successful businessman having carved his own fortune. ?Smooth faced? not only suggests attractive features but also an unblemished reputation, which in all society is greatly idealised and upheld: a tarnished image was tantamount to social ruin. However, when Jekyll is in the form of Hyde, he is ?not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something downright detestable.? The repetition used in this line describes how difficult it is to create an adequate portrayal of the man: significance of Hyde?s inconceivable yet hideous abnormality.

    • Word count: 1510

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • To what extent does the novella

    "In conclusion, the book often compares things to having a good or evil side, even in the imagery of simple objects. There are strong connections to each person containing a good and evil side, which I believe Stevenson fully thought. I also believe that a person has a good and evil parts, it just depends on which path you choose to follow in your life."

  • Analyse how Stevenson uses settingatmosphere and characters to help the reader interprete a sense of danger,threat and horror.

    "Dr. Jekyll in his will leave all of his possessions to Hyde in the strange case of his disappearance. The readers are truly mystified to find that a highly thought of person such as Jekyll wishes to leave all of his possessions to such a horrible person such as Hyde. I found that the part of the story containing the most suspense was when Jekyll had locked himself in his room. Stevenson describes what goes on in this extract. But the words were hardly uttered, before the smile was struck out of his face and succeeded by an expression of such abject terror and despair, as froze the very blood of the two gentlemen below. They saw it but for a glimpse, for the window was instantly thrust down; but that glimpse, had been sufficient, and they turned and left the court without a word. In silence, too they traversed the by street; and it was not until they had come into a neighbouring thoroughfare, where even upon a Sunday there were still some stirrings of life, that Mr Utterson at last turned and looked at his companion. They were both pale; and there was an answering horror in their eyes God forgive us! God forgive us!"

  • Discuss Stevensons presentation of the charchacter of Mr Hyde in the novel

    "In conclusion, I think that Hyde has been portrayed to be the pure evil of Victorian times and that Robert Louis Stevenson was really writing about the battle between good and evil. For example the times all through the book when Jekyll has had to clear up after Hyde's mess (trampling the child was covered up with a cheque) is like the Victorians having to clear up after mistakes in their society and lives. Another example is Hyde being scared that Jekyll could stop him from living, which is saying that in the end good has more power over evil. In the book there is also an element of pity towards Hyde, as if he is the misunderstood character, but I suppose this pity for him could be a trap and in the end you will never see any real good out of him, this is along the lines of what Jekyll said in the final chapter. In this book, Stevenson has focused on Juxtaposition (opposites) and Jekyll and Hyde's battle with each other is a metaphor of this. This book was a horror novel in Victorian times, and rightly so, with their obsession with hell and "Jack the Ripper" still roaming the streets this novel gave them even more reason to fear God and the evils that surround them."

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