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Jekyll and Hyde

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Introduction

The Stranger Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Coursework In Robert Louis Stevenson's novel The Stranger Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde he uses a variety of different techniques to create all the elements required in a successful Gothic Horror fiction novel. He uses symbolism, animal imagery and contrast to make the story interesting to the reader. The symbolism technique is used to build up climax in the story. He uses signs such as the 'moon' to represent a sense of mystery due to the moon being continuously connected with supernatural creatures such as werewolves in many Victorian stories which feature Gothic Horror. Furthermore it is also connected to duality and change of appearance and behaviour between two characters. This is similar to the contrast between Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. The contrast that is created is that of Dr Jekyll's change of personality and behaviour from a respectable, handsome gentleman with a wealthy career as a Doctor to a fowl looking irrational troglodyte. Along with the contrast of personality and the change of appearance comes the contrast between the areas in which the two completely different characters live. Mr Hyde lives in the Soho area which was known for its shabby streets and its muddy ways described as a 'nightmare' filled with poverty and filth. Robert Louis Stevenson's novel The Stranger Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was first published in the late 19th century in the year of 1886. The novel The Stranger Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is written as a Gothic Horror fiction. Gothic Horror was a major genre used in writing and theatre in the Victorian era. ...read more.

Middle

R.L Stevenson also uses the presence of light fog amongst the streets as symbolism to add to the mystery and conspicuous existence and build up suspense to attract the reader's attention. R.L Stevenson uses the setting to symbolise upcoming danger and mystery surrounding the character of Mr Hyde. In contrast he uses the same setting of the full moon and the light fog to create a beautiful romantic scene of peace surrounding Sir Danvers Carew's character and state of mind. R.L Stevenson uses the maid to distribute the two sides of how the setting should be approached by the reader depending on the characters present. As well as the setting itself Stevenson uses it to show that Mr Carew represents The Good and in contrast Mr Hyde represents The Bad. During the meeting of these two different characters Sir Carew approached Hyde with very pretty manners of politeness and bowed before Hyde. However Hyde was not interested in a conversation due to his irrational thinking. Instead he 'trifled' his very heavy cane listening with 'ill-contained impatience'. I believe that because Mr Hyde was in a hurry to get somewhere, his building impatience and inability to keep his feelings under control caused his 'sudden' uproar of 'great flame of anger' which lead to him 'clubbing' Sir Danvers' body with his can until his bones 'audibly' shattered. The sudden uproars of fury, violence and emotions of Hyde are purely up to Hyde's inability to control his feelings and actions and his irrational state of mind. Stevenson uses a variety of techniques when describing the murder of Carew. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand Stevenson describes her behaviour as 'well mannered' and that her appearance was as if her face was 'smoothed by hypocrisy' (pretending to be evil). This is a perfect example of dual personality because the old woman's behaviour contradicts her appearance. This leads people to believe she has two different personalities. In conclusion, Robert Louis Stevenson uses a variety of techniques in The Stranger Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde each with a variety of effects on the reader. He uses animal imagery to portray the bad, in-human nature and irrational thinking of Hyde by using powerful adjectives and complex sentences. The effect that animal imagery has on the reader is one that builds a picture of the violent and 'ape like' character of Hyde. Stevenson uses contrast to explain fully the differences between the characters, setting and atmosphere. He uses contrast very well because he links the contrast with other techniques like the doppelganger effect and the symbolism technique. R. L. Stevenson uses the symbolism technique to predict forthcoming events in the story by using the weather, atmosphere and surroundings. For example if the weather turns foggy and dark then that makes the reader believe something bad and mysterious will happen. A good example of this is when Stevenson uses the full moon to predict something mysterious by linking the moon with supernatural beings like a werewolf. However, the technique that I believe Stevenson uses best in this novel is the Contrast because he links all the other techniques listed above. An example of this link is when Stevenson links the same weather, atmosphere and setting to two characters (Hyde and Sir Danvers Carew) completely in contrast to each other in The Carew Murder Case chapter in the novel. Denis Spahiu 10M ?? ?? ?? ?? Denis Spahiu 10M ...read more.

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