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"Even though Pip has become snobbish by the end of Book One, Dickens still manages to make the reader like him". Show how and why Pip has become something of a snob and what makes us retain our sympathy for him - Great Expectations.

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Introduction

"Even though Pip has become snobbish by the end of Book One, Dickens still manages to make the reader like him". Show how and why Pip has become something of a snob and what makes us retain our sympathy for him - Tom Beach In Great Expectations Dickens depicts Pip as having an increasingly snobbish character throughout Book One. He shows Pip to have an exaggerated respect for his social position and his growing hatred for the common life that he lives. The reader sees that Pip's snobbishness is due to his desire to become a gentleman and his aspiration to be liked by Estella, from whom he adopts some of his snobbish attitudes. Even though it is clear to the reader that Pip has become somewhat of a snob, Dickens encourages the reader to still like Pip. He puts across that Pip is an orphan and that these snobbish feelings we see are just outward feelings. We learn that he was not proud of the snobbish character that he had become from the way he looks back on his life as an adult. These events make the reader feel sympathy for Pip, leading the reader to retain their criticism of him. ...read more.

Middle

He is impressed by all the wealth, glamour and beauty, idolising it. He makes it his ambition to raise himself to meet their standards of life. This urging to be uncommon causes Pip to become 'dissatisfied' with his life. Pip feels that he is socially inept. We also see Pip develop his snobbish attitudes due to the way he is influenced by other characters. The character that influences Pip the most we see to be Estella: "With this boy! Why, he is a common labouring-boy!" From the very first time we read of her, the reader learns that Estella is a snob herself. She is condescending, scornful and adopts a superior manner and attitude; she feels she is better than 'boy' (Pip). We see Pip adopting Estella's dismissive attitude, leading him to be something of a snob. The reader notices that Pip takes these harsh comments very seriously as he kicks his 'thick' boots into the wall in dismay. Pip has fallen in love with Estella; he aspires to be loved by Estella adopting some of her attitudes. We see that Pip does not want Estella as his is at his 'commonest and grimiest' he wants to make sure she will never see him like that because she 'would exult over [him] and despise [him]'. ...read more.

Conclusion

This part of his character pleases the reader by displaying Pip's courage and boldness. We notice that Pip is not always to blame for some of the less favourable acts he commits. We sometimes see Pip being used to fulfil other characters ambitions; this is illustrated when Magwitch forces to 'get [him] a file' and to get '[him] wittles'. The fact that Pip is being used against his own will makes the reader feel sympathy for him. Throughout Book One of Great Expectations we see Pip depicted as a vain snob. The reader realises this due to the false sense of social position that he gains and his willingness to dismiss his own community. The reader notices this increased snobbishness in Pip is due to his desire to become a gentleman and aspire to be loved by Estella and to live up to the standards required at Satis House. Towards the end of Book One the reader is able to retain their sympathy for him, we see that as he looks back from an older age he is very sorry for the way he treated Joe and Biddy. We take sympathy for him when Magwitch and Estella pick him on. The reader starts to admire him for his boldness and witty character. ---Tom Beach ...read more.

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