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Evil Deeds Macbeth Committed.

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Introduction

In the play there are many evil deeds that Macbeth committed. These include the murders of Duncan and Banquo, Lady Macduff and her son. Macbeth is also responsible for Scotland's disorder. Macbeth plays the main role in each incident, with the other characters being only minor and undeveloped; acting as vehicles for Macbeth's actions. It is possible that it is not entirely Macbeth's fault for the evil deeds in the play. In Act II, Scene II Macbeth is patented as a hero, when he defeated Norway in war for his country. 'O valiant cousin, worthy gentleman' Initially, the Elizabethan audience consider Macbeth as a respectable and well like character. We do however learn that appearances can be deceptive which corresponds with the main theme; 'Fair is foul, Foul is fair' which is referred to a lot throughout the play. This theme is first introduced in Act I, Scene I where the witches foretell the struggle between the forces of evil and good. It is also an indication that all will not be as it seems. This portrays a character as being much worse if the audience's first impressions of that character were positive. Macbeth's meeting with the witches brings a prediction which symbolises the beginning of Macbeth's downfall. ...read more.

Middle

Banquo was much more naive than Macbeth. His was not totally surprised when he found out about the murder which would indicate that that he was prepared for such an event. The next evil deed committed is the killing of Banquo, whom Macbeth fears knows too much. 'To be thus, is nothing, but to be safely thus.' Macbeth is indicating that he needs security to be King. His intention is to remove any threat to his throne. Macbeth is very calculated; he really knows what he is doing, more so than in the murder of Duncan. He acquires two murderers to kill Banquo. He manipulates them into believing that it was Banquo's fault that they are poor. 'That it was he in times past, that held you so under fortune,' Macbeth uses the same taunt that Lady Macbeth used against him, by insulting the masculinity of the murderers. Macbeth did not kill Banquo himself for a number of reasons. The detection was an issue, which also lead to the fear of Banquo's honesty. He feared Banquo would tell about Macbeth if he detected anything. Macbeth has become deeply involved in the game. Macduff, because he did not turn up to the feast, probably has suspicion about Macbeth. Macbeth has to carry on killing so that he will not feel that because he is only a beginner, that this is where his fear is coming from. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Macbeth is weak, Lady Macbeth is strong; when Macbeth is determined, Lady Macbeth is tormented. The witches and evil can play a small part in the final conclusion. Their prophecies encouraged Macbeth's ambition to be king. The witches told him he had nothing to fear because he could not be killed by a man born from a woman. 'The power of man: for none of woman born Shall harm Macbeth.' With the minority of people today believing in the powers of the supernatural, it would be quite ludicrous to say that it was the witches that controlled the plot. Shakespeare writes his plays for the audience to not know what is going to be the final outcome before finishing the performance. If we knew this then consequently the action would become dull and predictable. The witches only played a small part in the evil deeds. It was Macbeth that chose his own fate by believing in the witches and giving into temptation both from the witches and the guidance from his wife. In conclusion, Macbeth is, for the most part, responsible for the evil deeds. In Shakespearean times it may have been said that he was the victim of the powers of darkness such as when Lady Macbeth conjured up the powers of evil and prayed to the powers of darkness. Similarly, the witches who the Elizabethans would have believed to be a very real thing. ...read more.

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