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Examine all the soliloquies spoken by Cassius, Brutus and Mark Antony.

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Julius Caesar Coursework Date - 12/02/04 Done by, David Hayim Attias I will examine all the soliloquies spoken by Cassius, Brutus and Mark Antony. In each soliloquy I will look for: * How we see their true characters * The character's development in the play * How the soliloquy affects the plot of the play * The imagery used in the soliloquies * How the audience reacts to the soliloquy. The first soliloquy that I will analyse is Cassius's first and only soliloquy, in Act II scene ii. It starts with Caesar's procession, during which a soothsayer appears and says, "Beware the ides of March." After this procession Brutus and Cassius are left alone. They have a long talk about the impending danger, Caesar, and discuss how he is rising to power. Cassius tells Brutus about his 2 personal experiences with Caesar. Cassius is telling these stories and this subject about Caesar because Cassius knows that Brutus has noticed that Caesar has been rising to power as well and that Brutus is worried about it. Brutus admits his fear when he says, "I do fear the people Choose Caesar for their king." Once Cassius hears these words from Brutus, his manner of speaking changes immediately. Before those words he was suggesting the matter indirectly, but after it he goes straight to the point and starts attacking Caesar more openly. They keep on talking until Brutus tells Cassius that he will think about this more in his own time, and then Brutus leaves Cassius alone. ...read more.


He is now almost convinced about joining the conspiracy for the murder of Caesar. We feel very sorry for Brutus because what he thinks is an act of honour, really is an act of treason, which he will pay dearly with the life of his wife first, and then with his own life. In his second soliloquy Brutus reads the letter found by Lucius, which happened to be on the window sill. He is now certain that he should join the conspiracy and kill Caesar whilst he is still in his "shell". In this soliloquy he focuses the most on these three words, "Speak, Strike, Redress!". He interprets these words to mean that he should, first speak and revolt against Caesar, strike and kill Caesar, and then everything will redress, become good and normal. We see now even clearer how Cassius has found Brutus' weak point, and how he has used it for his advantage. Brutus exposed himself and Cassius has taken complete advantage of it. The audience is shocked how Brutus is so easily convinced by Cassius to join them. In his third soliloquy Brutus says about how his mind has been occupied since Cassius confronted him about Caesar. He has not slept because of it. He talks about how hard it is for him, the time from when he made the "first motion" deciding to join the conspiracy, till the time of the actual "act", for him it is "like a phantasma or a hideous dream". ...read more.


Next, he shows how Caesar was not a tyrant. Once this is accomplished he finally has the citizens on his side and can finally proclaim the civil war. "Most noble Caesar! We'll revenge his death." Antony's second soliloquy it is only two lines but the audience reacts strongly to his words. We see raw and pure hatred inside of him, and that he will endanger the lives of the Roman civilians, cause a major war, just to have his revenge. We see the chaos caused by Mark Antony in the next scene because even a person who has the same name as a member of the conspiracy will have to suffer and die. It is ironic that by killing Caesar, a potential tyrant, it has resulted in bringing out another, even worse tyrant, Mark Antony. We have found that Cassius is sly, ruthless and has blind ambition and will do anything to get what he wants, which is to kill Caesar and get his revenge. Brutus is an honest and honourable man, who is deeply concerned for the people of Rome. He is true to himself and others, but has a few major weaknesses within his character. Mark Antony was "a limb of Caesar", but once Caesar was murdered Antony had a transformation and became like Cassius. He was a calm person, listened to music and was generally a happy person. "he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music;" After the murder he turned into a sly, ruthless, conniving person whose only passion was to seek power in Rome and take revenge on the conspirators who killed Caesar, at any cost. 1 ...read more.

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