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Examine how dickens' description of character and setting contribute to the creation of the mood in three different points in the novel Great Expectations

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Introduction

Great expectations. In this piece of coursework I am going to examine how dickens' description of character and setting contribute to the creation of the mood in three different points in the novel. I am going to explain three important chapters that shape the play, Firstly I will be looking at the opening graveyard scene where Pip meets Magwitch, this is very important as it shapes his future. The second chapter I will be looking at is Chapter Eight at Miss Havishams house, where Pip meets Estella and begins to fall in love with her. And finally Chapter Twenty-Five at Wemmicks house where Pip learns how to become a Gentleman. Firstly I am going to look at the graveyard scene. This chapter is where we first see evidence of Dickens' gothic style. The graveyard was a "bleak place overgrown with nettles" referring to the church and the graveyard. This gothic style fits in very well with this chapter as Dickens has set the scene in a graveyard next to a church. This, together with the overgrown nettles and neglected grass makes the graveyard quite an eerie place to be. The area beyond the graveyard is described as "dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard". ...read more.

Middle

Half of her jewellery was left "sparkling on the table" This shows us that Miss Havisham was so enraged and upset when her fianc� left her that she stopped everything. She stopped putting on her clothes; she stopped putting on her jewellery. She stopped arranging her veil. She stopped time. The fact that Miss Havisham doesn't let in any of the sunlight coveys a picture in our heads of a very depressed room. The language that Dickens uses in this chapter produces an atmosphere of neglect and sadness. The final point in the novel, which I shall analyse, is Chapter Twenty-Five, when Pip visits Wemmicks house. The mood created in this section of the novel contrasts greatly with the previous two sections as the setting and the characters take on a far more humorous and light-hearted feel. On the way to Wemmick's house, Pip saw a village that "appeared to be a collection of black lanes, ditches and little gardens" which to Pip presented an aspect of a "rather dull retirement". Then as they approached Wemmicks house Pip sees a happier, more pleasant house. Wemmicks house was a "little wooden cottage in the midst of plots of garden and the top of it was cut out and painted like a battery mounted with guns". ...read more.

Conclusion

In Chapter Eight, Miss Havisham comes across as cold-hearted, bitter women who dislikes men and believes that all men should have their hearts broken just like hers was on her wedding day. Like Magwitch, she changes towards the end of the novel when she is confronted by Pip. Miss Havisham is distraught with guilt of what she has done to Estella and to Pip. She understands that she has ruined Estella's life by brainwashing her into disliking men. She ruined Pips life by doing this to Estella as Pip loves Estella but she is unable to return his love. Miss Havishams death shows the audience that she has got feelings and maybe couldn't handle the guilt so she killed herself. Overall I think Wemmick is the only character that doesn't change. Dickens effectively shows us the characters emotions and feelings and he made all of these events shape Pips future. I enjoyed reading this novel and I noticed that the two characters that came across a great change during the novel, Magwitch and Miss Havisham, were the two characters that died. I also noticed Pip was present at both of their deaths and I think the reason Dickens did this was to bring out Pips true feelings and show the audience how much he really cared for them. ...read more.

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