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Examine How Shakespeare Presents Love in A Variety of Forms in ‘Romeo and Juliet.’ Consider How Different Characters Interpret the Meaning of Love.

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Introduction

Examine How Shakespeare Presents Love in A Variety of Forms in 'Romeo and Juliet.' Consider How Different Characters Interpret the Meaning of Love. By Anon Shakespeare presents love in many different ways, using many different styles and types of language. I intend to present these different types of love. Romeo and Juliet represent Romantic Love in this play. In the very beginning of the play, Shakespeare uses the phrase 'star-crossed lovers' (prologue, line 6). By using this one phrase, Shakespeare has already set apart the love of Romeo and Juliet, from the other types of love presented in the play. On one level, this phrase is suggesting that their love is fated. This is also true throughout the play. There are many words and sentences that serve as reminders of their tragic destiny. 'Star-crossed lovers' is also a clever play on words. There are numerous references to the way that their true love lights up the skies. For example: 'It is too rash, too unadvis'd, too sudden; Too like the lightening, which doth cease to be Ere one can say "it lightens"' (Act 2, Scene 2). Romeo's first reaction to Juliet is that she 'doth teach the torches to burn bright' (Act 1, Scene 5). When he catches sight of her in the orchard, she is the 'light (breaking) through yonder window' (Act 2, Scene 2). Juliet shares this view of their love. Initially, she is suspicious of the suddenness of the feeling, fearing it is like lightening 'which doth cease to be Ere one can say, "it lightens"' (Act 2, Scene2), yet by the wedding night she is making a comparison to the luminescent quality of Romeo's love, '............ ...read more.

Middle

Parental Love is shown in various forms by the following characters Lord and Lady Montague, Lord and Lady Capulet, Friar Laurence, the Nurse. Lord and Lady Montague do not appear that often, but throughout the play there is the underlying theme of their parental love towards Romeo. Lord Montague is a caring father towards Romeo. At the beginning of the play, he asks Benvolio to find out what is troubling his son, 'Could we but learn from whence his sorrows grow, We would as willingly give cure as know'. (Act 1, Scene 1). After the fight with Tybalt, he pleads with the Prince not to punish Romeo. 'Not Romeo, Prince, he was Mercutio's friend; His fault concludes but what the law should end, The life of Tybalt.' (Act 3, Scene 1). Lady Montague says very little in the play but, like her husband, is motivated by concern for Romeo. After Romeo is exiled from Verona, Lady Montague dies of grief, 'Alas my liege, my wife is dead tonight! Grief of my son's exile hath stopp'd her breath.' (Act 5, Scene 3). Shakespeare presents Lord Capulet as a wealthy, elderly man who is used to having his own way. We see from his words that he can be an affectionate father, 'She is a hopeful lady of my earth.' (Act 1, Scene 2). But when crossed, his temper is quick and violent. When Juliet is an obedient daughter, he is kind and protective towards her. But when she refuses to obey him he explodes, 'Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what, get thee to church o' Thursday, Or never after look me in the face.' ...read more.

Conclusion

He does not wish Romeo to be viewed as a coward and to be mocked as such. He cannot stand to see Tybalt mocking Romeo; and Romeo doing nothing more than pleading with Tybalt to stop. He is quick to lash out to protect Romeo, in honour, dignity and physically. 'O calm, dishonourable, vile submission! Alla stoccata carries it away. Tybalt, you rat-catcher, will you walk?' (Act 3, Scene 1). Conventional love is explained briefly in the character of Juliet towards the County Paris. I believe that when Juliet agrees to marry the County Paris she is involving herself with a love of convenience. She consents to marry the County only to appease her father until such time as she is able to act on the plan earlier concocted by Friar Laurence, a plan to help her escape her fate. She does as the Friar tells her, for she can see no other way out. 'Hold, then. Go home, be merry, give consent To marry Paris.' (Act 4, Scene 1). In conclusion I can see that Shakespeare presents love in many different forms throughout the play. Romantic and Parental Love being the most prominent types. Shakespeare has taken the most widely known types of love and incorporated them all in this one play. I think that this in part is what makes 'Romeo and Juliet' one of the most successful love stories in the history of England. People can relate to 'Rome and Juliet', as at one point in most people lives they have experienced at least one of the types of love from Romeo and Juliet. I received an A for this piece of coursework, if anyone needs anymore help my email address is alean24@hotmail.com . I hope this helps 1 ...read more.

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