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Examine the dramatic and significance of Act Three Scene Three to the rest of the play:

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Introduction

Examine the dramatic and significance of Act Three Scene Three to the rest of the play: Ultimately this scene is key to the plot as it is one of the longest scenes in the play. Many themes are explored and elaborated on in this scene as a result of it being so lengthy. We see the change in the main protagonist, Othello, from a very dignified gentleman into a crazed maniac, vowing revenge against his once beloved wife. I shall be exploring how the plot, characters, language and dramatic devices, used by Shakespeare add to the dramatic importance of this scene and to the rest of the play. This scene is important to the rest of the play because it accelerates the plot. The audience were already prepared for what was going to happen for the duration of the play, through a series of soliloquies and asides. Shakespeare immediately makes us, the audience aware of Iago's dislike towards the "black ram" from the very onset of the play. We find out that Othello had overlooked Iago for promotion in the army, he instead appoints Cassio the position. ...read more.

Middle

Through a series of asides and soliloquies Iago includes the audience in the knowledge of his plans. He tells the audience the way in which he wants things to turn out. The audience are informed of his plan involving the capturing of the handkerchief, which provides the ocular proof, Othello had been demanding. Another reason explaining why this scene is significant to the rest of the play, in terms of Iago's methods to destroy Othello is the ability of Iago to raise questions suggesting Casio's involvement in Othello and Desdemona's relationship. He asks these short questions insinuating about Desdemona's infidelity so that Othello starts to question his own knowledge of his relationship with Desdemona. After Iago's string of short questions: "Honest, my Lord?", and along with his deliberately vague responses: "My Lord, for aught I know", we can clearly see the tension and anxiety building up in Othello, when he screams: "Think, my Lord!" This shows the dramatic importance of how Iago's character has the ability to manipulate other characters; in particular, Othello. Iago plays on Othello's insecurities. He pin points them and then uses them to his advantage, to wreck and ruin the main protagonist. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is evidence clearly displaying how Iago's malicious plans have influenced Othello to think in these ways. Near the beginning of the scene, we can clearly see that there is a strong bond of love, affection and mutual respect. He calls her names, such as: "Sweet Desdemon", and "My Desdemona". Likewise, Desdemona refers to Othello as her "good love", and her "Lord". However, while the poison is working on Othello, we can clearly see the change in his character. Shakespeare succeeded in creating dramatic tension within his play of Othello. He uses literary devices such as short and snappy speeches, along with punctuation marks to ensure that a high level of tension is created. The use of soliloquies involves the audience in the drama as it reveals the characters inner most thoughts and feelings. A device, used by Shakespeare, called dramatic irony also adds tension and suspense to the play. An example of this is when Desdemona drops her handkerchief, which is crucial to the plot because then the audience is aware, through Iago's soliloquy where he informs them of how he is going to destroy Othello and Desdemona's relationship. The audience is made to know more then the characters in the play. This play on the audience ensures a greater build up of tension. ...read more.

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