• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Examine the dramatic techniques used by Shakespeare to manipulate the audiences response to Richard.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Richard 3rd English Coursework For this essay I have been given the question; examine the dramatic techniques used by Shakespeare to manipulate the audiences response to Richard. I have restricted myself to examining two scenes in detail. 1.2 Richard is an extremely quick verbal swordsman and Shakespeare demonstrates this by having very fast interplay between Richard and Anne. Imagery is used - he invokes St.Paul twice, (line 36 and 41) and most of his audience would have been aware that this Saint was one who had undergone a transformation (for the better) in his character. (Probably not so amongst the rank and file of a modern audience) Anne responds by calling on a higher authority in her speech, mentioning God three times between lines 50 and 70. The religious imagery continues, with angels being counterpoised with devils (Anne - O wonderful, when devils tell the truth - Richard - More wonderful, when angels are so angry) ...read more.

Middle

The effect that this has on the audience is twofold. Firstly the audience gain respect for Richards's skill with language and persuasion, secondly they see what kind of man Richard really is. His speech and tone in his soliloquy shows that he takes pleasure from his acts and looks upon the situation as a challenge for himself. As a reward for the successful completion of his challenge he will "Entertain a score of tailors and study fashions to adorn my body, since I am crept in favour with myself," This also creates the feeling that Richard "plays" people to achieve his aims and looks upon his actions as some kind of game. The audience cannot help but admire the sheer courage of this man because only a very confident individual could attempt to win the love of his victims' wife within such a short space of time (or at all). ...read more.

Conclusion

As Richard is killed very soon after, the audience must feel sorrowful for Richard as in previous scenes we have seen the development of a conscience ("By the apostle Paul, shadows have struck more terror to the soul of Richard than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers,") and a change in his attitude. He no longer sees it as a game. The audience must be moved by these troubles in him and when he is killed the audience have gone from hate to sorrow but not quickly. The change has happened slowly over the course of the play as we see Richard himself change to a different man. He no longer takes the mischievous pleasure that he used to, he no longer smiles with delight when one of his tricks succeeds. He is a changed man, haunted by the shadows of his victims and hated by the earthly survivors. We cannot help but grieve for this man as he dies because he is now grieving for those that died by his hand. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Richard III section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Richard III essays

  1. Write a review of the opening sequence of 'Pretty Woman' analysing the techniques used ...

    cheap and tacky, this contrasts which the type of jewellery the people at Edward's party were wearing. Once Vivien is out of bed we see what sort of clothes she wears at night when she is out on the Hollywood Boulevard.

  2. How far would you say Shakespeare creates sympathy in the minds of the audience ...

    A Tudor audience may favour Richard's decisions as he is doing it with one aim in mind; to become king. However, a 21st Century audience would most likely take a different stand on Richard's actions, and he would therefore be perceived as 'treacherous and back-stabbing'.

  1. How does Shakespeare represent female characters in Richard the third?

    Line 57 act 11 scene 2, "But death hath snatched my husband from mine arms!" She obviously still misses her husband and is bitter for his death. The significance that she is telling this to another female character shows her strength, as she would not let her vulnerable emotions out

  2. 'In his depiction of Richard III Shakespeare has created much more than a simple ...

    The pace of the monologue changes and important elements of Richard's character and his aims are revealed starting from line fourteen. In lines ten to thirteen, he started to criticise the soldier (although we didn't know it until we look on further), saying that they succumb to women after war.

  1. 'In his depiction of Richard III Shakespeare has created much more than a simple ...

    In 1.3Richard also likens the troubles to dark clouds looking down threateningly (lour'd) on the House of York. His side (the House of York) is now able to rejoice and be happy in victory. Similar to Romans they bind laurel wreathes to their brows.

  2. Richard III by William Shakespeare - “How genuine was the relationship between Richard and ...

    This dramatic revelation has a profound effect on Edward. When Stanley enters to ask Edward's pardon for one of his servants who has killed a gentleman in a brawl, Edward reproaches asking why no-one begged him to spare Clarence. The king is full of grief, remembering his brother's services to

  1. This excerpt is taken from the very first act of Shakespeare's play 'Richard III', ...

    Richard, having read the works of others who had also been inclined to be hostile towards him. For example, Sir Thomas Moore, a respected lawyer and scholar, was one of the first Tudor propagandists. He was chancellor to Henry VIII and depicted Richard as a man who was "little of

  2. How does Shakespeare shape the audience's perception of Richard in Act One scene one ...

    Shakespeare also uses the devise of metaphor to shape the audience's perception of the play in other ways. Later in the scene, for example, Hastings enters the stage. He has recently been released from the Tower for unknown reasons and starts with a metaphor: 'More pity that the eagles should be mewed Whiles kites and buzzards prey at liberty.'

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work