• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Examine the importance of the conch, fire, Piggy's glasses, the pig's head and the beast in the Lord of the Flies

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Examine the importance of the conch, fire, Piggy's glasses, the pig's head and the beast in the Lord of the Flies It is clearly evident, to anyone who has studied Lord of the Flies, that each of the symbols portrayed are so important in the novel, that it would be non-existent without them. The entire novel is about symbolism with almost each and every person place and thing representing something different. Even the very island on which the story takes place symbolises the larger world outside the story. On establishing this, it is easier to understand each of the other symbols and the importance of these in the novel. We are introduced to the conch in the first chapter. When Ralph and piggy first find the conch, they are fascinated by it. When describing the conch's appearance, Golding uses beautiful and pure imagery 'eighteen inches of shell with a slight spiral twist and covered with a delicate, embossed pattern', creating an image that the conch is a good and important thing to have on the island. ...read more.

Middle

Ralph and Piggy cared more for the fire than the other boys, showing that they remained more civilized than the rest, 'There was a ship. Out there. You said you'd keep the fire going and you let it out!' Hence, the signal fire stands for the amount of civilization left on the island. It also comforts the boys at night; pushing away the darkness and making the boys feel safe. Ironically, at the end of the novel, a fire finally summons a ship to the island, but not the signal fire. Instead, it is the fire of savagery-the forest fire Jack's gang starts as part of his quest to hunt and kill Ralph. This proves that the fire was important because without it, the boys would never have been rescued. Piggy's glasses are also a very important symbol in the novel. Piggy is the most intelligent, rational boy in the group, and his glasses represent the power of intellect in society. ...read more.

Conclusion

The complicated symbol of the pig's head becomes one of the most important images in the novel when Simon confronts the sow's head in the glade and it seems to speak to him, telling him that evil lies within every human heart and promising to have some "fun" with him. "Fancy thinking the Beast was something you could hunt and kill! You knew, didn't you? I'm part of you? Close, close, close! I'm the reason why it's no go? Why things are what they are?" In this way, the Lord of the Flies becomes both a physical expression of the beast, a symbol of the power of evil, and a kind of Satan figure who evokes the beast within each human being. Looking at the novel in the context of biblical parallels, the Lord of the Flies recalls the devil, just as Simon recalls Jesus. In fact, the name "Lord of the Flies" is a literal translation of the name of the biblical name Beelzebub, a powerful demon in hell sometimes thought to be the devil himself. As the pig's head and the beast represent the Lord of the Flies, they illustrate great importance. Nicola Maxwell Form 4 Ms. Graham ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Lord of the Flies - The symbolism of the conch, its importance in the ...

    It is the act of touching the shell itself that brings democratic power and as the island erodes and savagery begins to dominate the boys, the conch looses its power and influence among them. The conch starts out "glistening" and was pure and innocent when it was first found, but

  2. Analysis of Lord of the Flies.

    Instead, he indicates his new orientation toward savagery by painting his face like a barbarian; leading wild, eerie chants among the hunters; and apologizing for his failure to maintain the signal fire only when Ralph seems ready to fight him over it.

  1. Themes, Motifs, and Symbols - Themes are the fundamental concepts addressed and explored in ...

    Ralph tells the group that there are no adults on the island, but that if they remain calm and orderly, they will eventually be rescued. He says that there is a great deal of edible fruit on the island, and that if they work together, they will be able to survive.

  2. Explore the importance of the character Simon in "Lord of the Flies".

    special place and he is a silent witness to yet another evidence of the boys decline in sanity. The boys place the sow's head on a stick and leave it on that spot, as a sacrifice to the beast so that it wouldn't attack them, showing that their carrying out

  1. The Conch - "Lord of the Flies"In William Golding's novel "Lord of the Flies" ...

    Ralph clutches the shell desperately when he talks about his role in murdering Simon. Later, the other boys ignore Ralph and throw stones at him when he attempts to blow the conch in Jack's camp. The boulder that Roger rolls onto Piggy also crushes the conch shell, signifying the demise

  2. 'Lord Of The Flies' Is An Allegory. Examine The Symbolism In The Novel. ...

    We got to do something.' (Piggy, page 10) ''I expect we'll want to all their names,' said the fat boy, 'and make a list. We ought to have a meeting.' '(Piggy, page 5) There is not much description of Jack in Chapter one as what he becomes a symbol for

  1. The Importance of the Beast in Lord of the Flies.

    Jack and his choir are made the hunters and Jack the leader of them, they also have to look after the fire on top of the mountain. Ralph, Piggy, Simon and some of the littluns are in charge of the shelter and rescue.

  2. The Significance Of The Conch

    Not only does he use it to represent order, but now also for inspiration. When he can't find the words to say, he uses the conch to find them. Sooner, rather than later, all hell breaks out in the meeting, and arguments rise about everywhere.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work