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Examine the presentation of either Othello, Desdemona or Iago in Act 1 of Othello.

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Introduction

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Middle

Here the audience tries to find motives for Iago hating Othello who seems a nice enough person. Does Iago have an inferiority complex, it does seem possible, however it seems more like he feels betrayed by Othello who after years of campaigning together choses another man as his lieutenant and does what seems to Iago as the ultimate insult by marrying a woman who he really cares for and loves, the disgust Iago feels because Othello�s looked for companionship elsewhere than the army is in a way typical of a soldier as is his language and some of his actions. However there is also the element of evil in Iago�s choice to punish Othello and we have already see his ruthlessness at work when he wakes up Brabantio. He is like an actor too caught up in his work who ultimately comes to believe that he is all his characters at the same time, however Iago is more in control of his characters and can be described in a way as a chameleon who can be any number of people without any normal person being able to recognize him through his parts. The sheer pleasure Iago gets from turning people against each other and causing pain and sufferance is a sign of motiveless evil as Coleridge once put it: �The motive hunting of a motiveless malignancy�. ...read more.

Conclusion

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