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Examine the views of love presented by the title characters in Romeo And Juliet

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Introduction

Examine the Different Ways Love Is presented by the title characters in 'Romeo and Juliet' The characters Romeo and Juliet do not just show physical attraction but also an attraction in a spiritual and religious aspect. The play describes their love to be the truest and deepest love of all time. Even though they are both in love, both of the characters have different ways of presenting it. Romeo is more impulsive and reckless in his actions; in comparison Juliet is calmer and practical. This is shown through Shakespeare's choice of language when the characters interact with one another. Romeo is clearly the more romantic character, as shown by Shakespeare's use of figurative language, particularly when he is expressing his feelings towards Juliet. However, Juliet, being the more practical and sensible character is more concise in her language choice. It is in this way that we can identify the different ways that love is presented by Romeo and Juliet. We identify that Romeo's first true love starts when meeting Juliet as he forgets his "dearest love Rosaline" from the previous scene. Earlier, Romeo mentions Rosaline every time he spoke but after laying eyes on Juliet, Rosaline is forgotten and never mentioned again. We understand this, as Romeo says, "did my heart love till now" showing that he had no actual feelings for Rosaline and that he was merely infatuated with her. ...read more.

Middle

Romeo would not normally perform all these acts, so we can see how Juliet's love has impacted Romeo. This is when we clearly start to see a difference in the title characters Romeo and Juliet. However their love is equally strong: Romeo is risking his life so he can rush to see Juliet again but Juliet is cool-headed, takes her time and plans what she is going to do. When Romeo enters the Garden he continues to speak in his ornate and religious tone: " Call me but 'love', and I'll be new baptized". This shows how Romeo can only talk about Juliet in abstract terms and not in realistic terms of existing problems that affect them in the surrounding world. This differs to Juliet who enters the garden without knowing that Romeo is there. Juliet here is more direct and practical: " Ay me! ... Tis but thy name that is my enemy." This shows Juliet is more direct as she involves herself by using words like 'me', 'thy' and 'my'. This is showing her practicality, skill and intelligence to sort problems out: "What's Montague? It is nor hand nor foot, nor arm nor face, nor any other part belonging to a man". This scene lucidly shows the two different characters of Romeo and Juliet. ...read more.

Conclusion

She wants their love to be serious and official and untouchable so she proposes for marriage the next day: " Thy bent love be honourable ... thy purpose marriage". She also consults with Romeo on her plan so it seems they are both part of making their relationship: "what o' clock shall I send thee?" This also shows she is well organised so nothing will go wrong. Being well organised is another sign of maturity. By examining the different ways love is presented by the title characters, Romeo and Juliet we can see that they both are equally in love but they have different ways of presenting it. We see that Juliet possesses practicality. Which is in contrast to Romeo as he is more impulsive. This makes Juliet more relaxed unlike Romeo who finds it hard to control his feelings. This is something unusual in their era, as it is an opposite of what is expected. In the Elizabethan era the men were thought to be superior and clever. They could marry anyone they wanted and it was the females who used flattering phrases to win a male's heart. Shakespeare's intention here was to show that Romeo and Juliet's love is special as they did not follow the stereotype of love in those days but started something new; this meant that it was true love making it the deepest love of all time. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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