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Examine The Ways In Which Alice Walker Uses Language To Reflect Celies Growing Maturity And Confidence.

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Introduction

Examine The Ways In Which Alice Walker Uses Language To Reflect Celie's Growing Maturity And Confidence The language Walker makes use of at the beginning of the novel portray Celie as a very innocent and na�ve child. The letters themselves, especially the first six, are quite simplistic and na�ve in both language and style and this further suggests the immaturity of Celie. The impression the first letter suggests is that Celie is a very confused, na�ve young girl. Walker has included what appears to be a crossed out mistake in the very first letter. This is very significant as not only does it indicate Celie's confusion and state of mind at this point in time, but also that perhaps Celie is not confident enough to express her true emotions. Furthermore, despite Walker's inclusion of somewhat explicit, obscene language to describe the horrific abuse Celie suffers, one does not feel that this piece is, in any way, perverse. ...read more.

Middle

is becoming sexually interested in her also. Also, the shortness of the sentence that closes this letter, "I don't bleed no more," in terms of both length and tone further indicate that not only does Celie wearily accept her fate but she is also beginning to understand the female anatomy and the fact that her abuse has reduced her womanhood. By the eighth letter, the reader begins to view Celie in a different light. Walker ensures that Celie's natural intelligence begins to shine through. Her humour, albeit dark and ironic, is an indicator that Celie is still very much alive and in touch with herself despite her tragic life to date. Walker ensures there is a surge in Celie's confidence by letter ten. This is the point Celie sees and recognises her daughter. Celie musters up the courage to actually speak to the child's mother as an equal and questions her daughter's heritage. ...read more.

Conclusion

By letter nineteen, Walker has developed Celie's character by the expression of more emotions. Celie is able to convey humorous situations with adeptness and is also beginning to express jealousy against Sofia. Additionally, Celie begins to understand the merits of female companionship and the 'sisterhood.' Walker's language becomes more centred on activities that link women such as 'quilt making.' Celie begins to connect to Sofia on a different level and this is also mirrored in the friendship they form. Yet despite all this, Celie is still essentially quite ignorant. In letter twenty two she professes ignorance for the "nasty women's disease" and, therefore, sexual relations in general. This ignorance, however, does not necessarily extend to all of Celie's knowledge. In letter twenty four, much of the language is focused on Albert's weaknesses. This is quite an innovative move for Celie and this courage shows that whilst she is still essentially quite na�ve, she is beginning to gain confidence and stature. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sasha Jones Sofia Ashraf A2 English Lit. Chris Hardman ...read more.

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