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Explain how Magwitch has changed from Chapter 1 and 39 to the changes in Pip and his reactions to the convict.

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Introduction

Explain How Magwitch has changed from Chapter 1 and 39 to the changes in Pip and his reactions to the convict In the beginning of chapter 1 Pip is approximately 7 and in chapter 39 he is 23. Circumstances have changed because in chapter 39 Pip is in London and he has refined himself as a gentleman. In chapter 1 Magwitch is not named but is just called "the convict". This gives the reader a sense of detachment from the character like he's an object or possession and this lets the reader relate with Pip to give us an inclination that the convict is some type of "bogey-man". Pip is repulsed by Magwitch and doesn't fond him dignified like he didn't find Joe good enough when he comes to tea. Pip treats both of the people that have come humbly to him as a hindrance and nuisance. Pip looks down on Magwitch like Estella looked down on him and this is because he was aspiring to be everything that he wasn't like a gentleman and more refined. With the news that Magwitch comes to tell Pip it shatters Pips great expectations. ...read more.

Middle

Dickens descries the graveyard as "a savage lair" and in chapter 39 Dickens describes Magwitch as looking like a beast so he creates an allusion. Dickens makes Magwitch still very vicious looking throughout both chapters, but in 39 you sympathise more with him because you know that he a kind man at heart. I also felt sympathetic with Magwitch because in chapter one he says that h took the pork pie when it was Pip so that Pip didn't get into trouble, this makes the reader think that there must still be some goodness in him if he admits to something that he didn't do just to keep Pip out of trouble. Repetition and alteration are used in both chapters like in chapter 1 Dickens says "glared and growled" and in chapter 39 he says "mud, mud, mud" to suggest to the reader that its heavy and feeling that your "bogged down" and is onomatopoeia. Magwitch was a threat for Pip when he was a boy and is a threat to him now that he is a man. This is because both times that Pip has seen him, Magwitch startles Pip. ...read more.

Conclusion

that the higher up I society you were the lighter the sentence that you got because Compeyson was the brains behind most of the fraudulent work and Magwitch only accompanied him so he therefore shouldn't have been given such a gruesome sentence as Compeyson but because Compeyson was a gentleman he was incarcerated but didn't receive such a bad sentence as Magwitch did. This shows a highly imbalanced society because it meant that your birthright was the social standing that you would have all of your life. Dickens writes for all types of readers because he opened it with a chilling chapter, this would interest the readers that were interested in stories like Frankenstein as it was written around the same era and the first chapter is the one that Dickens had to write to interest and enthral the reader. The characters in the novel are very moral like in Jane Eyre by the Bronte's which was a popular book being read at the time, because Pip is very moral in the sense that he keeps to his word and whenever he does something wrong i.e. when he is rude to Joe he feels guilty about it. Lavinia Engleman ...read more.

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