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Explain how Miller builds-up and develops the character of Eddies Carbone in the three key scenes from A View from a Bridge.

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Explain how Miller builds-up and develops the character of Eddies Carbone in the three key scenes from A View from a Bridge 'A View from the Bridge' centres predominantly around a poor Sicilian patriarchal community. The first publication of the play was 1950 in United States. The play was set around 1940-1960 and the setting of the play was in Brooklyn. Their culture entails loyalty and family honour at any cost. Arthur Miller has used these fierce cultural beliefs as an aid to build up dramatic tension, irony, hatred and love through the characters who are supposed to abide by this notion. He also uses characters with strong personalities and potentially dangerous character flaws to create and develop the character. Arthur Miller's intentions of writing the play were for it to be a Greek Tragedy. The Greek tragedy shows the downfall of an individual through the capacity and limitations of human life. It is a melodrama because it involves action and improbable events. The play was first presented in a one-act format. This enabled Arthur Miller to make the action continuous drawing attention to the single line of plot which emphasises the inevitability of the ending. It is also like the Greek tragedies because it observes the unities of being a single plot, strong story line, a single setting and a continuous time or a 24 hour time span. To reduce the time span Arthur Miller introduces a chorus which is undoubtedly Alfieri, he is the super-chorus who narrates the play with a habit of hopeless intervention. ...read more.


Catherine tries to defend herself, but is reduced to tears when Eddie harshly comments on her. At the very begging of the play it becomes apparent that Eddie cares a lot about Catherine and is very affectionate and caring towards her. This conflict portrays Eddie as possessive and very protective over Catherine, which builds up an initial view of Eddie in the play. The Sicilian male-dominated society may be reason why Eddie is so protective over his niece, Catherine. When Beatrice tells Eddie that Catherine has been offered a job, he is instantly cynical and nervous as well as angry. He stubbornly says he doesn't like the neighbourhood' and she'll be with a lotta plumbers.' This underlines his possessiveness. Eventually Eddie gives in and becomes more relaxed. However, the audience is aware that his possessive nature has merely been temporarily drowned and will inevitably resurface. By exposing Eddie's character flaws Miller is creates an initial view of Eddie. The audience is aware that Eddie tries to shy away from the truth about his feelings for Catherine and, therefore an inevitable conflict will eventually arise. Beatrice asks Eddie 'I don't understand you; she's seventeen years old you gonna keep her in the house all her life?' Here it reveals to us that Eddie has an unhealthy but concealed obsession towards Catherine, far beyond when Rodolfo comes on to the scene and disturbs this obsession towards Catherine. Later he begins to tell a story about a boy who had lived next door to Eddie many years ago who was named Vinny Bolzano who had 'snitched' on his uncle to the immigration. ...read more.


The lawyer gives the impression that the family honour and respect are important within the Sicilian community and that there is a great distrust of the law. Miller has underlined the significance of honour and justice by saying, 'Justice is very important here.' As an audience member you realise that this potentially a key aspect of the play. It subtly creates apprehension about what will inevitably happen. Alfieri concludes his introduction by saying 'and sat there powerless as I, and watched it run its bloody course,' which, makes the audience expect a tragic outcome to be resolved in blood. Throughout Alfieri's introduction there is a sense of dramatic tension and an inevitably destiny. Miller slowly engages the audience with Alfieri's dramatic introduction and makes them feel apprehensive. Miller also uses Alfieri to create a judgement of Eddie and as an aid to creating tension throughout the play. He narrates and comments at key points and he is, also an active character. His powerless status makes the outcome of the story seem inevitable. Alfieri is portrayed as a powerless observer, which creates sense of inevitable fate and therefore emotion, tension and an impression towards Eddie is generated. To me this play has no surprise really. One knew in the beginning if the play more or less what was going to happen by the end of the play, which was a factor why I liked the play a lot because what was really involved was not what was going to happen but how it was going to happen, which is a much stronger way if a telling a tale. Brahalathan Balakrishnan 10R Dr.Peters EN2 16/10/06 ...read more.

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