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Explain what happens in Act 3 from Danforth's point of view and show how Arthur Miller makes it clear to the audience that Danforths is not only misguided but deliberately ignores any evidence that casts doubt on the stories of Abigail Williams

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Introduction

The Crucible Essay question: Explain what happens in Act 3 from Danforth's point of view and show how Arthur Miller makes it clear to the audience that Danforths is not only misguided but deliberately ignores any evidence that casts doubt on the stories of Abigail Williams and the other girls. The Deputy Governor Danforth is an interesting character in Arthur Miller's play "The Crucible". His character is complex and his role in the play is open to interpretation. It is clear that Danforth is not only misguided but deliberately ignores any evidence that casts doubt on the stories of Abigail Williams and the other girls. Danforth is a religious, respected man who is two positions down from the King. This means that he should be respected, and is by many. Yet, his judgements are contradicted by other characters, such as Reverend Hale, who believes that Danforth is unfair. Danforth is mentioned for the first time in the play in Act Two by Elizabeth Proctor. ...read more.

Middle

Danforth feels that Corey is trying to determine what the court shall believe and what it shall set aside. This is shown in Danforth's words. "Do you take it upon yourself to determine what this court shall believe and what it shall set aside?" These words are filled with authority and contribute to the idea of Danforth's reputation and authority making him proud. Mr. Corey pleads for his wife to be spared, uneasily Danforth says, after it is said that he has hard evidence, "Then let him submit his evidence in proper affidavit." It seems as though in this situation Miller has chosen to make Danforth seem to not be understanding and fair. This makes him seem cold. Yet, I assume that Danforth thinks that Mr. Corey is wasting time for an attempt to prove an innocence, which cannot be proven. Danforth says for Corey's hard evidence to be properly submitted, instead of shouted out during a court session. He may think that he mustn't falter and needs to get on with his job. ...read more.

Conclusion

But, she denies it. Danforth chooses to take her first response without giving her time to think. He may be doing this because he feels that it is not an important issue and that John Proctor is lying and is untrustworthy. He may have only confessed to lechery to get Abigail Williams in trouble. By this point Danforth is most probably feeling a little bit confused. What contributes to this is when Mary Warren is spoken to. Mary Warren had taken a hand-made poppet, made by her, back to the Proctor household where it was found with a pin in it in Act Two. Mary Warren's innocence is fumbled when Abigail and the other girls pretend to be witnessing her spirits attacking, or threatening them. Danforth is convinced by the girls' performances he believes that Mary warren has in fact sent her spirits out to harm the girls. Danforth accuses Mary because he is utterly convinced. My view on Danforth is that he believes what he wants, does what he wants and is proud of his authority and reputation. I think, also that this is the attitude that Arthur Miller intends you to have. Word count (essay itself): 1,032 ...read more.

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