• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain what is happening in the passage of pages 120-128. What is shown about the relationship between the characters? How Cathy might be interpreted by different readers.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Sophie Hale 12Mc Explain what is happening in the passage of pages 120-128. What is shown about the relationship between the characters? How Cathy might be interpreted by different readers. It is this passage that Cathy realizes that she has made the wrong decision. She shouldn't have married Edgar she should be with Heathcliff. This realization is first saw when she saw her reflection in the mirror. 'Is that Catherine Linton?' Cathy asks this question because she saw someone that she does not recognize. She used to be a healthy, strong, wild girl and in her reflection she sees a pale, weak and unhappy woman. By seeing her reflection the reader can almost imagine what she is thinking. It seems as if she sees in the mirror her surroundings and realizes that it is her decision that puts her in this position. She chooses to marry Edgar and as a result denies her love for Heathcliff. From a feminist point of view it is a sign of Cathy's empowerment that she has finally realized that she shouldn't have married Edgar for his high social status, instead she should have married Heahcliff to satisfy her own feelings of immense love. It also touches on the fact that in this time period, once Cathy realizes she has made a mistake there is no way out of it, she has no means of escape, she is trapped. ...read more.

Middle

Also in this paragraph a complete turn around of Cathy's personality is shown. She is previously such a strong minded, self-confident character however it seem as though she has transformed in to a women with immense paranoia and depression. Not only has she realized that she wants to be with Heathcliff therefore feels regret and sorrow, but the man that she does have to stay with, the man she married, to her, does not care of her mental and physical state because he has not been to see her. She believes that Edgar will be happy to see her gone so that it 'restores peace to his house' however this is not true. Edgar simply does not know of Cathy's state and this is all down to Nelly. Nelly has not informed Edgar as she believed that Cathy had invented her illness. I do not think that Nelly knows that in doing this she is actually making Catherine's illness worse as it is continually making her more distressed. 'Tossing about she increased her feverish bewilderment' this paints a visual picture in to the readers head of the true state that Cathy is in. It is as though with time her mental state is quickly turning in to madness that she can't escape. Just like she can not escape her marriage. ...read more.

Conclusion

His ignorance of Cathy's illness is shown 'Catherine is ill?' By Nelly not telling Edgar she has unknowingly ruined everything between them. Edgar has come too late because Cathy by this time has realized of her mistake. 'She gave him no glance of recognition' when he took her in to his arms. By this time she is in a different world, she no longer wants to be in this world of the Grange she wants freedom. It seems as if she has true hatred for Edgar. She acts as if it is his fault that Heathcliff and she are together when in fact it is her own fault. 'You are one of those things that are ever found when least wanted and when you are wanted never!' This shows she is mad that he has not come earlier when in fact it is all Nelly's fault for not making him aware. Catherine talks to him of death and where she wants her grave. This already shows that she has given up. It is as if she has no reason to live because she can't be happy without Heathcliff. 'My resting place where I bound before spring is over' 'in the open air with as head stone' this shows her link again with the moors. She wants to be buried there because it is where she feels safe; free and where she experienced the happiest times of her life. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Emily Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Emily Bronte essays

  1. Relationship between cathy and the two men

    They would play together on the moors, laughing and rambling. They were so attached to each other that they even slept in the same bed in childhood. Nelly says - 'Cathy was much too fond of Heathcliff.' Nelly also says that keeping the two of them separate was the greatest punishment they could inflict on Cathy.

  2. Compare and Assess at least two of the following approaches in feminist theory, with ...

    The use of the re-emergence of the choice between patriarchy and desire through Cathy has the object of; 'articulating the mother-child relation as a site for both affirm the archaic force of the pre-oedipal, which although repressed is thus also preserved.

  1. Discuss the relationship between literary and film versions of a particular 'romance' text. What ...

    He is bought home by Mr Earnshaw and is just explained to be 'from the streets - a gipsy'. His background remains anonymous to the reader throughout the book as well as the movies (Cranny-Francis). In the novel, Nelly Dean tells Lockwood the narrative from her personal insight to the family having been with them for three generations.

  2. Do you agree with the view that most readers despised Heathcliff?

    I cannot live without my soul!" This is not selfishness; he is describing a love that holds nothing back and he remains true to his love even when Cathy has betrayed him for Edgar. When he returns he plans to have revenge on Hindley and to "look in" at Thrushcross Grange and make sure Cathy is happy.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work