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Explain you response to the character of Juliet, exploring the ways in which Shakespeare presents her to the audience

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Introduction

WJEC English Literature coursework Essay topic 7: Explain you response to the character of Juliet, exploring the ways in which Shakespeare presents her to the audience Juliet is a fervent and sensual character whom Shakespeare has also revealed to the audience as sly and ardent. She is young but presented to us as very mature, she receives all the audience's sympathies as she receives very little help or guidance from home. Trapped in love she conveys her readiness for sacrifice to be with her beloved; for this she receives our respect and so we have a special bond with her. I am writing about the character of Juliet in the Shakespeare play and exploring the ways in which Shakespeare presents her to the audience. This play is set in Verona, Italy in 1599 and is a play of two families the Capulets and Montagues who are in bitter feuds with each other. The setting in Verona Italy is appropriate to the play as the setting is known to people as the city of love which is one of the main focuses of the play. Juliet is part of the Capulet family and is 14 almost years old in the play when she faces tragedy. she is quickly regarded as a heroine. In the play Juliet is portrayed by Shakespeare as a compassionate and sensual character who stands up for what she believes in. She is frequently found in emotional and empathetic situations where she is stuck between two sides of a dispute. Throughout the play Shakespeare presents the audience with conflicting stages of compassion and emotion for Juliet such as when Juliet kills herself with a dagger after finding her beloved Romeo dead. In this Scene the audience are in grief and sorrow for Juliet's tragic loss whilst Juliet's death also brings a sense of anger to the audience towards Friar Lawrence for causing their deaths. ...read more.

Middle

"My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give thee The more I have, for both are infinite." (Act 2 Scene 2 - p.g 39, line(s) 133-135) After Juliet meets Romeo Shakespeare has made Juliet seem more mature and shrewd, through the use of Juliet's aptitude to predict her fate; which I mentioned earlier. Shakespeare also makes Juliet more mature because this allows the audience to feel Juliet's love for Romeo as being so strong that it can change her attitude. She is acting impulsively now and we are anxious for her. In Act 2 Scene 5 the nurse acting as a go between tells Juliet of Romeos plans to get married with the aid of Friar Lawrence. In this scene Juliet is impatient and eagerly awaits news from her nurse about Romeo, in this scene Shakespeare starts to use similes and metaphors in Juliet's language. "Unwieldy, slow, heavy, and pale as lead." (Act 2 Scene 5 - p.g 53, line(s) 17) Here she says that the nurse moves slowly. Other similes and metaphors Juliet used in this scene are; "She would be as swift in motion as a ball" (Act 2 Scene 5 - p.g 53, line(s) 13) These are used effectively to emphasise her impatience for news of Romeo. They also revel Juliet's witty side. Imagery is used by Shakespeare to enable Juliet to express the deep love she feels for Romeo; "Love's heralds should be thoughts" (Act 2 Scene 5 - p.g 53, line(s) 4) The audience of the play can feel the depth of love between Romeo and Juliet which Shakespeare is trying to convey, through Juliet's use of metaphors and similes. This use also brings out dramatic tension in the play as Juliet waits anxiously for news of Romeo; it is used by Shakespeare because the audience sympathise with Juliet and want her and Romeo to be together, however it won't happen. ...read more.

Conclusion

(Act 4 Scene 5 - p.g 101, line(s) 59-61) The lack of weeping from the parents reinforces for the audience the fact that Juliet was unloved by them and that Romeo is the best thing for her, as we the audience are closer to her then we ever were we want what's good for her. Juliet actually dies alone in the vault where her body has been moved, she kills herself with a dagger after finding her beloved Romeo dead. Even the Friar leaves because he is scared when he hears a noise. As life has no meaning without Romeo, Juliet has no reason to live so she kills her self violently with the use of a dagger which she bravely and poignantly plunges into her chest; "O happy dagger, This is my sheath." (Act 5 Scene 3 - p.g 116, line(s) 169-170) By Juliet's suicide being carried out in such a violent way she is presented to the audience as brave and courageous; her actions show us that she is loyal to Romeo to the end even though she could have left she prefers death to life without Romeo. Shakespeare presents Juliet as an imaginative, impetuous and mature girl who is a victim of oppression by her parents. Her character sometimes quite sensual is also presented to the audience as sly and ardent. We the audience have a bond with her as she goes through the play feeling conflicting emotions for what she believes in. Juliet has a much more complex character than Romeo whose been well established from the very beginning of the play, her imagination is some what over the top which makes her more interesting then Romeo. Shakespeare uses Juliet to predict forthcoming events to the audience through her major soliloquies. Juliet deserves the status of a tragic heroine because she has all the makings of one; she sacrifices herself in the name of love and she is proven to be courageous and valiant through her suicide. She is indeed 'true and faithful', and ends the feud through her suffering. 7 1 ...read more.

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