• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explore Austen's Presentation Of Marriage In

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Joanne Hua 10 Jupiter Ms. Pomeroy 28th February 2003 Explore Austen's Presentation Of Marriage In "Pride And Prejudice" Even from the first sentence, we can already tell that the novel will be focusing on the essential issues of marriage and wealth. It stresses a society where marriage is a very important and essential preoccupation. Marriage and wealth are closely linked together; the richer a man was, the more probable it was that single women would want to marry him. Austen tries to summarize the two main issues in her opening sentence "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." This doesn't appear to be the author's own 'voice'. She seems to put it in a very sarcastic way. The writer says, "it is a truth universally acknowledged..." this appears extremely exaggerated since she expresses that this is a fact recognized by the whole universe, which is highly unlikely. The next part of the opening sentence that sounds ironic is "a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife". She uses the word 'must' to put across the certainly in her statement. However, this isn't true of all rich, single men; not all wealthy, single men are seeking a wife. ...read more.

Middle

After hearing through his letter that she had been deceived by Wickham, she quickly changes her opinion of Darcy and realises her error in misjudgement. Austen has a clever way of revealing things to us slowly and gradually. Jane and Bingley and Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner are two examples of particularly good marriages. They get on well and share the same interests, humour and tastes. Elizabeth believes that marriage should not be about wealth or money, but love. This reflects exactly what Austen feels towards marriage. The marriage between Mr. and Mrs. Bennet shows us a lot about what Austen thinks. This is clearly not a good marriage. It is a marriage that required compromise on both parts in order to work. Mr. Bennet constantly indulged in his wife and likes to agitate her on purpose. Austen's individual style of writing has a habit of showing us characters in action, conversations, social scenes, gatherings and characters interacting and we notice things about the way they speak, their tones of voice, and how they come across to us. This makes us judge them. For example, Mr. Collins: we have a low opinion of him because of the way he talks and because of his constant reference to Lady Catherine de Bourgh. ...read more.

Conclusion

Gardiner. This is one of the reasons why they are so compatible. Elizabeth has a good opinion of them, Darcy has a high opinion of them when he first meets them and this therefore drives the reader into having a high opinion of them too. It also reflects what the author feels is a good marriage because Mr. Gardiner was seen as a man of slightly lower status, but that didn't distract Mrs. Gardiner from being attracted to him. This marriage shows that they did not marry for money, but for love. The opinion formed of the Gardiners is totally opposite to those formed of Wickham and Lydia. The connection between Bingley and Jane is the first that is spoken of as a possibility of a marriage, but it nearly doesn't happen because Jane doesn't show her feelings as picked up by Charlotte Lucas. The marriage between Bingley and Jane succeeds because they both share similar interests and intellect. Elizabeth and Darcy are the central focus throughout novel and it is possibly the best example of a good marriage. They have to overcome a lot of difficult situations before they finally get engaged. Two of the main obstacles were prejudgement and pride. Austen is trying to say that marriage should be given careful thought and consideration. It should not be solely for money and status, but for intellect and true love. - 1 - ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Jane Austen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Jane Austen essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Pride And Prejudice:Why is the news of the elopement of Lydia and Wickham in ...

    5 star(s)

    family.? As a solution, he writes in a very unforgiving and non-Christian manner to banish Lydia: ?throw off your unworthy child from your affection for ever, and leave her to reap the fruits of her own heinous offence.? He doesn?t change his views even after Lydia and Wickham?s marriage: ?You

  2. Analyse Jane Austen's presentation of love and marriage in her novel Pride and Prejudice. ...

    The relationship of Wickham and Lydia was not based on money. In the letter to Elizabeth, Jane comments on how Wickham cannot be after the Bennet's money because they have none: "His choice is disinterested at least, for he must know my father can give her nothing."

  1. Jane Austins opinion of a good marriage.

    Jane goes with another aunt, and Lydia leaves for Brighton with a colonel and his wife. As each goes her own way, they have time to reflect on their own needs and desires. Elizabeth learns that Wickham was not totally truthful with her about his relations with Mr.

  2. Jane Austen's presentation of Emma as an unlikeable heroine

    She is more of a heroine because she has faults which help her relate to others. We can see form this that Austen likes Emma's personality because she has made her character that all can relate to and look up to.

  1. Discuss the treatment of marriage and class in The Son's Veto and The Odour ...

    The people that live in the town do not seem happy either. The miners, coming home from the mines, are described as "shadows diverging home". Being described as a shadow gives the impression of something incomplete and without feeling or emotion, it can move and mine coal but it is just a shadow, nothing else.

  2. Examine the different marriage relationships and attitudes towards marriage presented in 'Pride and Prejudice'. ...

    to want to marry for love; however, he is very easily swayed in his decisions and he would also like to impress his family. He is a sensible man with many good qualities about him. "Mr Bingley was good looking and gentleman like; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy,

  1. The ideas of marriage and the roles of women are very closely linked, compare ...

    'Strench Of Kerosene' is a short story based on Punjabi tradition and culture. The main characters in this story are Guleri, Manak, Manak's mother and Manak's second wife. It is about the rejection of a childless woman in society who doesn't fulfil her role as a woman.

  2. Remind yourself of volume 1, chapter 6. Discuss the presentation and significance of ...

    extent of Elizabeth's vile nature she is not an amiable character herself. Mary shows tendencies to be attention seeking, this is shown when Charles says, "I wish you could persuade Mary not to be always fancying herself ill." The use of the verb 'fancying' suggest that it is just a

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work