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Explore Hardy's use of settings at Talbothays in phase the third and at Flintcomb-Ash in phase the fifth of "Tess Of The D'Urbervilles".

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Introduction

Explore Hardy's use of settings at Talbothays in phase the third and at Flintcomb-Ash in phase the fifth of "Tess Of The D'Urbervilles". * Your response should focus closely on the language of both sections and explain how character and theme are developed in each location. * You should also demonstrate an awareness of the novel's historical context particularly with a view to C19th notions of 'nature' and morality. * Finally ensure that you paragraph your essay, incorporating word and phase level quotation in support of your argument. Hardy includes nature into his stories almost as an extra person. His writing is rich with the sharpness of the weather, the countryside and the creatures of his home town Wessex. The people of his home town live on the land in a totally different way in which we do as we now have high technology and live in urban areas. Tess in Hardy's story experiences both good and bad during her life as a farm labourer. ...read more.

Middle

There beauty is stressed as are religious images of the "resurrection hour". Angel also calls her "Artemis" and "Demeter" which are names of Greek goddesses. But then Tess says "call me Tess (Wants to be treated as a real person [Not idealised]) Soon Tess and Angel's relationship grows as they start to grow fond of each other. Hardy uses the seasons cleverly as he used the summers heat and mornings to create a sense of romance. Tess then goes on to marry Angel but not long after that Angel confesses that he had a relationship with an older woman before this. So Tess thinks great he won't mind about me, so Tess tells Angel her secret that she had been seduced by Alec. But unfortunately he can't take the fact o they split up and Angel goes to brazil and Tess goes to Flintcomb Ash. The setting at Flintcomb Ash is in the winter and far from the previous location. ...read more.

Conclusion

She then gets onto the train and reunites with Angel and runs away with him. During Tess's life she goes through two different types of feeling one of them is bad and one the other one is good. But like everything in life bad nearly always comes first. First she goes to find the D'Urbervilles because her Mum and Dad orders her in order to get rich. So then she goes to Alec's house to find them. But soon she gets seduced by him and raped. And that is the bad bit. But the good bit is that she meets Angel Claire and soon there relationship develops and they get married. But later Angel finds out that she was seduced by Alec and he leaves her. And that's the other bad bit. Hardy often writes stories in which bad people succeed and good people having bad things happening to them. The story then ends with a tragic ending, I think that Hardy has chosen a good array of words for his novel. But the only thins which is bad is that many of novels end with bad endings. ...read more.

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