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Explore How Act 1 Scene 5 of Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet is dramatically effective and why it is such a significant scene within the play?

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet Explore How Act 1 Scene 5 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet is dramatically effective and why it is such a significant scene within the play? Romeo and Juliet is a tragic story of love set in Verona. At the start of the play, the audience see a prologue, which informs them that the story is going to end in tragedy. The play is filled with huge contrasts of emotions. At the start of the play we see a fight between the Montague's and the Capulet's filled with violence and hatred when the play is actually about love. There are mainly two different themes in the play love and hate, both of which are in Act 1 scene 5. Love, from the love at first sight between Romeo and Juliet, and the hatred between Romeo and Tybalt. The plays needed to be affective pieces of drama at the time because of the way the audience would react if they weren't amused by the play and if it didn't keep them interested. These people were usually the lower-class people, the tickets were very cheap and these members of the audience stood at the very front near the stage. ...read more.

Middle

but once seeing Juliet compares her to a Beautiful white dove standing amongst a flock of Crows and by this he is obviously comparing Juliet to Rosaline. Also at the time women were expected to behave respectably, which meant they weren't allowed to act in theatre, so all actors had to be men. Romeo says: "For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night", this shows that his language emphasises that he feels something different for Juliet and that Rosaline is forgotten. Tybalt sees Romeo and immediately wants to fight him, Capulet may dislike the Montague's, but he is trying to obey the Prince's command. As a host, he cannot allow even an enemy to be attacked under his own roof. And he tells Tybalt, Romeo is "virtuous and well-governed". Tybalt is angry at losing the chance for a fight, and blames Romeo for this, especially when he is made to look silly by Capulet, who tells him off and calls him a "saucy boy", his panting here foretells what will come in the play, and the fact of hatred is obvious but Capulet wants to maintain his social status and it is shown that Tybalt is clearly unfinished with Romeo when he says: "But this intrusion shall, Now seeming sweet, convert to bitt'rest gall". ...read more.

Conclusion

She feels, like Romeo, that love is once and forever, and they both fear the consequences of their love, but without any thought of changing their minds or hearts. In conclusion, Act 1 scene 5 is very dramatic because the irony is that Romeo and Juliet do not know that they are from rival families and fall in love. They both know that when they each discover who the other one is, they can never have a happy future together. The audience will feel euphoric about the romance between Romeo and Juliet because of the way they fell in love at first sight and how Romeo presented Juliet with the Sonnet. They will also feel somewhat sad because they know that this love won't last long enough. The audience will also expect Tybalt to do something outrageous later on and drastically complicates the plot. I think this scene is very important because without it Romeo would still be thinking about Rosaline and the couple would've never fallen in love. The whole play wouldn't be what it is without the devices that Shakespeare employed to make it dramatically effective, it's also very significant to the play as it shows us the characteristics of each character and it also highlights inflicting themes of love and hate leading to a tragic ending. ?? ?? ?? ?? Anmar Teraifi 1 ...read more.

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