• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explore how Mary Shelley uses language to create a sense of horror and terror in Chapter 5 of Frankenstein(TM)

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Eliot Bryant Explore how Mary Shelley uses language to create a sense of horror and terror in Chapter 5 of 'Frankenstein' Horror and terror are built up by Mary Shelley throughout the novel around Victor Frankenstein and his monster. The language that Mary Shelley used is often emotional and powerful and so is likely to have a greater effect on the reader. In the 1800's, when 'Frankenstein' was written by Mary Shelley, the novel would have been seen or perceived differently as science was developing rapidly and the discovery of electricity prompted uproar in the religious and traditional people of Europe, this meant many people feared new findings in science, and so even without Mary Shelley's use of language, the sense of horror and terror would already be in the 19th Century reader before they'd even opened the book an started reading. Mary Shelley has built up horror and terror with the language she uses and the atmosphere she creates by provoking the reader's imagination which is already sparked off by the general fear of the supernatural and ungodly plot to the book. The same horror is recreated in the modern audience; however it is less effective as Mary Shelley's book cannot relate as well to the modern audience. ...read more.

Middle

Mary Shelley used the word 'wretch' to create a sense of horror and terror in Chapter 5, the word was used throughout Chapter 5 which is why it was so effective because it was repeated and used as a way of getting across to the reader, to remind them that this story is being told by Victor Frankenstein and so will be biased against the monster, not admitting that it had any chance to be good. She could be trying to tell the readers that he is calling it evil when it hasn't done anything evil yet, and so implying that Victor is the evil one because he rejected responsibility for his creation, and instead of correcting his error by immediately destroying the evil he had birthed, he was overcome by revulsion and fell psychologically ill. This is demonstrated with Victor Frankenstein saying 'How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe or how delineate the wretch whom with such infinite pains and care I had endeavored to form?' and 'A mummy again endued with animation could not be as hideous as that wretch.' The foremost quote shows Victor Frankenstein dehumanizing the monster, not only by referring to it as 'the wretch', but also calling it a 'catastrophe'. ...read more.

Conclusion

In Chapter 5, Mary Shelley uses pathetic fallacy to a sense of horror and terror and could use it to create a gothic atmosphere, an example of pathetic fallacy is 'I perceived that the fallen leaves had disappeared, and that the young buds were shooting forth from the trees that shaded my window'. Frankenstein contains a whole load of imagery pertaining to the landscape. Being well travelled, Mary Shelley knew many of the locations intimately, especially Geneva and its surroundings. This creates a sense of horror and terror through the image that it paints, it is a very gothic scene and one that is very visual and so this creates a sense of horror and terror in the modern audience as well. Mary Shelley uses language to create a sense of horror and terror, she used religion and science to create an atmosphere to the 19th Century reader. She also uses techniques, such as pathetic fallacy to create gothic imagery, which creates a sense of horror and terror upon the reader. Through her choice of language, such her use of the word 'wretch', she makes the reader interpret the story differently and by doing so can add to the horror and terror that is already in the novel. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Mary Shelley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Mary Shelley essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    To what extent can Mary Shelley(TM)s Frankenstein(TM) be seen as a Gothic Novel?

    3 star(s)

    'Frankenstein' is typical of gothic literature as it fulfils and contains many of the characteristics of a gothic genre for example: good versus evil, supernatural elements, grotesque and savage creatures, nature used to create atmosphere, the dark side of human nature, isolated characters, developments in science and technology, suspense and

  2. Peer reviewed

    Looking particularly at chapter 5 of the novel 'Frankenstein' explore how Mary Shelley creates ...

    3 star(s)

    "I saw the dull eye of the creature open..." This implies that the 'creature' is not human because it has yellow eyes; this makes the audience question what in fact it is. Also Frankenstein calls the "Lifeless thing" as his "catastrophe" rather than a human. He does not name his creation.

  1. Frankenstein. I aim to discuss and analyse the significance of chapter 5 to the ...

    I was unable to remain for a single instant in the same place; I jumped over the chairs, clapped my hands, and laughed aloud. Clerval at first attributed my unusual spirits to joy on his arrival; but when he

  2. Frankenstein - With particular reference to chapter 5 of Frankenstein, discuss how Mary Shelly ...

    She is concerned with the se of knowledge for good or evil purposes, the invasion of technology into modern life, the treatment of the poor or uneducated, and the restorative powers of nature in the face of unnatural events. She addresses each concern in the novel, but some concerns are not fully addressed or answered.

  1. DISCUSS CHAPTER 4 OF 'FRANKENSTEIN' BY MARY SHELLEY AND RELATE IT TO THE WIDER ...

    and arteries that he so desperately worked on, and his head was flowing with lustrous black hair, and picking out his pearly white teeth, but it 'only formed a more horrid contrast' against his watery eyes filled in with dun-white sockets, and his shrivelled complexion completed with straight black lips.

  2. How does Mary Shelley create a sense of horror at the creation of the ...

    Another device she uses is contrasting imagery such as, 'his teeth of a pearly whiteness...only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes'. This quotation juxtaposes the idea that the monster is both beautiful and ugly, simultaneously. Shellay uses pearly to illustrate the colour of the monster's teeth and

  1. Frankenstein - With particular reference to chapter 5, explore how Mary Shelley has used ...

    This technique is very effective in Mary Shelley's narrative and helps the reader to get more into the novel. Chapter 5 is a crucial chapter in Frankenstein, as it is when the monster comes alive and it's a turning point in the novel.

  2. "'Frankenstein' uses many characteristics of the Gothic genre to arouse the interest of the ...

    When Victor awakes after creating the monster, the morning is 'dismal and wet'. On discovering William's death 'the darkness and storm increased every minute'. Ironically, Victor says 'I watched the tempest, so beautiful yet terrific'. This sense of ambivalence will pervade the entire tale.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work