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"Explore some of the ways in which Bronte protests against the prevailing 19th century views on education and religion in the first nine chapters of 'Jane Eyre'."

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Introduction

The prevailing 19th century views on education and religion in the first nine chapters of 'Jane Eyre' "Explore some of the ways in which Bronte protests against the prevailing 19th century views on education and religion in the first nine chapters of 'Jane Eyre'." Imagine a girl growing up around the turn of the nineteenth century. An orphan, she has no family or friends, no wealth or position. Misunderstood and mistreated by the relatives she does have, she is sent away to a school where the cycle of cruelty continues. All alone in the world, she seems doomed to a life of failure. What's a girl to do? I think that Jane's later life is how Charlotte would have liked her own to be. It is like many stories, even those written in the present day, which is the author's fantasy. The fairytale-like ending resembles not just any fairytale, but one in particular, Cinderella. 'Jane Eyre' is set in the early to mid nineteenth century and we see how different life today is, compared with the time which Jane lived. Immediately we see that Lowood's religious education does not necessarily mean the orphans are treated well. Their food is basically inedible, their lodgings are cramped, and some of the teachers are cruel. ...read more.

Middle

Helen was a strong role model in Jane's life and when she died, Jane had then become emotionally able to deal with this, ironically through Helen's influence. Helen brought Jane down to earth and made her realise that she needed more self-control and needed to think before making doing anything. The passionate, highly-strung child we were first acquainted with matured into a much more admirable adult. Miss Temple was a mother figure for Jane, one that Jane actually admired and respected unlike the cold-hearted Mrs Reed whom Jane had no respect or admiration for at all. A rich girl living in the nineteenth century was expected to be 'seen and not heard'. These model girls would read the bible, obey their elders, act happy and contented at all times and never argue or answer back. Their childhood was just full of acting how it was seen fit to act at that time, much like their womanhood would be. Rich girls also would be pretty and be artistic, showing this by singing, playing the piano and painting. A rich boy living in the nineteenth century was supposed to be quite the opposite of what was expected of a girl. Boys should have physically strong and active. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jane meets Mr Rochester, a complex man, when she is a mature young woman. Mr Rochester treated Jane equally to himself. Instead of treating her politely and formally, he treated her as a friend, so his contrasting bad temper that had a tendency to flare up unexpectedly was not as much of a shock as it would have been if all she had heard from him was polite words. Also, the fact that Jane had had an unkind childhood helped her to deal with Mr Rochester's temper. Mr Rochester admired Jane for her courage and inner strength. Then Mr. Rochester fell in love with this passionate yet plain girl and the book conveniently ends in a marriage of the two, as it would also happen in a Bollywood movie. I think that Jane's later life is how Charlotte would have liked her own to be. It is like many stories, even those written in the present day, which is the author's fantasy. The fairytale-like ending resembles not just any fairytale, but one in particular, Cinderella. The reason why Charlotte wrote this book was to show people how unfair the world is and it's not usually noticed, so people need to think about what is happening in the world and try to stop the injustices. Jane Eyre Essay Ms. Moore (MR) 08/05/2007 By Prabu Singh 11 EW (P) 1 of 4 ...read more.

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