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Explore the Dramatic Techniques Arthur Miller uses in his play 'A View from the Bridge' to engage the interest of his audience?

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Introduction

Literature Coursework Assignment Explore the Dramatic Techniques Arthur Miller uses in his play 'A View from the Bridge' to engage the interest of his audience? 'A View from the Bridge' was written by Arthur Miller. It is set in the early 1950s, Miller was interested in the lives of dockworkers and longshoremen of New York's Brooklyn harbour, where he had worked and where the story is set. Miller heard the story from a lawyer friend who had mentioned that he knew of a longshoreman who rattled to the immigration Bureau on two brothers, his own relatives, who were living illegally in his home, in order to break the engagement between one of them and his niece. A few years later Miller visited Italy and combined the experiences gained, about the Italian immigrants working in Brooklyn with the knowledge of men in Italy hungry for work. ...read more.

Middle

The bridge from the title could interlink the old world of Justice and Honour to the new world of law and punishment. Alfieri's character is a dramatic technique used to engage the interest of his audience by linking the characters to the audience. After Eddie he plays the most important role, as he is in some of the action. When Eddie consults him this is essential it explains how he has come to know the story. Miller wanted to make the play a modern version of classical Greek tragedy, where a central character is led by fate to a destiny he cannot escape. In ancient plays an essential part was that of a chorus, a group of people who would watch the action comment on it and address the audience directly. In 'A view from the bridge' Alfieri plays the 'chorus'. He introduces the plays themes. ...read more.

Conclusion

The effectiveness of the stage set is a dramatic technique. The play is set in red hook and the Carbones livingroom/diningroom is the main focus of the action but the street outside and Alfieri's desk is partly represented. The audience is aware of both the private and public contents in which the play is set. One director set the stage with no scenery on set apart from Eddies chair central stage, this would be dramatically important as it showed Eddie being surrounded by family and friends in the beginning but as the story develops, slowly the characters move back, in till Eddie is all alone. Even in millers production the stage is limited this is set to be symbolic of Eddies relationship with the community and his friends. Miller uses these dramatic techniques to engage the interest of the audience in my opinion this has been successful. , ...read more.

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