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Explore the implications of 'dreams' in John Steinbeck's novel, 'Of Mice and Men'.

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Introduction

Dreams in 'Of Mice and Men' Explore the implications of 'dreams' in John Steinbeck's novel, 'Of Mice and Men'. A dream can be described as an ambition or the aspiration to reach a goal in life. In the novel "Of Mice and Men" John Steinbeck creates characters to have an optimistic dream. These dreams are ones which they would all like to make a reality. They all have a longing and desire to fulfil their dreams. For example, Lennie and George are both working to get their own land. George and Lennie represent many who have this dream for their future. Many people travelling to ranches have the dream of having their own land and having the ability to be in control of their own lives, unlike reality, where they have to abide by what the owner of the ranch says. It is comparable to the American dream. This states that one is able to achieve anything if they have the mind and desire to carry it forward. The dream is contemplated during the time of the Great Depression, therefore the dream is beyond their reach however it is still on their minds. This gave confidence and inspiration to the characters. When the immigrants arrived in America, they were looking for a better way of life. It is almost used as an escape from a "dead" life, to create a new life from scratch and to escape from the poor conditions and the poverty. ...read more.

Middle

To make the dream come true, George tells Lennie he must listen to everything that he tells him. To encourage this and to make things easier for George, he says " specially if you remember as good as that" when Lennie remembers not to say a word when they go to the ranch the next day. Having a mental disability, Lennie does not have an adult mind. He can only think like a child, therefore when George says that they are going to get the land, he believes this completely. Therefore I think that in the eyes of Lennie, as he cannot see reality and life as it really appears, the dream is more vivid and to George, who can see the truth, that it is going to take much hard work and time to get to their dream, it is not so vivid, as he knows it will be hard work to achieve what they have come out to achieve. "George, how long is it gonna be till we get that little place an� live on the fatta the lan� - an� rabbits?" this quote shows that Lennie has complete faith in George and that he thinks they are definitely going to fulfil this breathtaking dream. Lennie says "Come on, George. Tell me. Please, George. Like you done before" this shows that Lennie is committed to make their dreams come true. ...read more.

Conclusion

He had become just like Crooks. They were both lonely and had nobody to care or love for them. As George is getting ready to perform the murder that will save Lennie much pain in the future, he tries to make Lennie happy. He says "look acrost the river, Lennie, an' I'll tell you so you can almost see it." He tells him how it is going to be when they get their dream. He does this so that he can have a quick and easy death. Curley's wife also has a dream. She dreams to act in a film, in Hollywood. As the person that told her did not call, she had no choice but to marry Curley and her dreams were also destroyed. He destroyed her dreams as he treated her like a dog, as he always kept her on a tight leash. By this phrase I mean that she is not allowed to do much, without the approval of Curley. To conclude, it is prominent that dreams play a major role in the novel. None of the characters dreams did ever come true, although most characters dream large. The main dream is of Lennie and George, of getting a farm of their own, which is also crushed. Lennie crushed his own dream as well as George, Candy and Curley's wife. However it is evident that the characters tried to make their dreams become a reality, yet ended up not having a dream but crushed hopes... 2 1 ...read more.

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