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Explore the psychology of the relationships which develop between Sherlock Holmes and the people he has dealings with. Explain why the character of Sherlock Holmes as a fictional detective has endured in the public imagination.

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Introduction

YEAR 11 GCSE English 19th Century Prose Coursework Sherlock Holmes Short Stories Write an extended introduction to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's short stories. Set them in their cultural and literacy context. Prepare a new reader for the differences in use of language. Show, with close reference to the central characters in the three stories you have studied, how Sir Arthur Conan Doyle reveals his own keen intellect as a medial practitioner piecing together diagnostic evidence from a series of small details. Explore the psychology of the relationships which develop between Sherlock Holmes and the people he has dealings with. Explain why the character of Sherlock Holmes as a fictional detective has endured in the public imagination. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's creation of Sherlock Holmes is one of the most exciting figures in all of English fiction. Doyle's stories about the eccentric, but brilliant detective and his trustworthy observations were apparently based on one of his teachers at the University of Edinburgh, where he studied medicine. There is evidence of his own medical training at Edinburgh arises from time to time in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's detective stories. Sherlock Holmes appeared in a total of 60 stories, written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and was published between 1887 and 1927. The Sherlock Holmes' stories were written in the late 1890's where Queen Victoria was on the throne. ...read more.

Middle

Watson also states that Wilson has "small fat encircled eyes". Doctors are trained to pick up on physical appearance, which has come through in the text. The image is very descriptive, which gives the audience more of a life like vision to what the character looks like. The language is exceedingly formal and polite between Holmes and Watson. From the dialogue in the text, Watson tends to be exaggerative with his formalness towards Holmes. For example, when Watson interrupts Holmes in a conversation, he says "I apologise for the intrusion, forgive me". When Holmes disturbs Watson by waking him up early in the morning he says, "Very sorry to knock you up Watson." The reason for the difference in the formal language spoken between both Holmes and Watson could be to show the audience that Holmes is more superior to Watson, so therefore he needs to show more respect towards him. This could also be because of the hierarchy, if you had a respectable profession, you would be looked upon with respect from the people below you. The formal language spoken in the narrative is spoken differently from the Victorian times to nowadays, back then they were more polite. Sherlock Holmes is the main feature of the stories. He has an amazing talent to draw up conclusions from the infinitesimal details. For example, from looking at Jabez Wilson he noticed that he has done some manual labour, he noticed this by the way Wilson's right hand is slightly larger than his left where his muscles have been developed. ...read more.

Conclusion

He may have had a hunch that, one of his animals may have caused the death of Helen Stoner's sister, but didn't let did not tell Watson his hypothesis. This maybe is because Holmes has had many successful cases in the past, and with his experience he may have found not compulsory to enlighten Watson as he knew what he was doing. Sherlock Holmes has treated his clients slightly differently to each other. This may have been because of that all three clients went to Sherlock Holmes for his assistance with different cases or because of his client's status in society. For example in The Red Headed League, Jabez Wilson was looked down upon by Watson; this maybe was because Wilson was a prawn broker. Victor Hatherly, form The Engineer's Thumb was told to lie down and he was offered breakfast and some brandy. Hatherly's occupation was an engineer. Compared to Wilson, being an engineer is more respectable than being a prawn broker, whom at the time may have been seen as greedy. Today many people still believe that Sherlock Holmes was a real detective who was alive in the Victorian times, not realising he is actually a fictional character. Holmes has proved to be a sensational character that is intriguing. The fact that the settings in the novels are actually real places might have helped triggered off the assumption that the stories are written on a detectives real life. Farzana Baksh - 11SK - Page 1 - ...read more.

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