• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explore the reasons why Othello, orders the death of Desdemona and Cassio with reference to Act3 Scene3

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explore the reasons why Othello, orders the death of Desdemona and Cassio with reference to Act3 Scene3. Othello is a play about love, hatred, death and deception. Othello is partly betrayed by flaw in his own character. He orders the death of Cassio (his friend and ensign) and Desdemona (his wife) for a number of reasons. Chief among these are is that he is rash, violent and aggressive. He is an angry man who believes whatever Iago tells him with blind faith. He is confused by Iago's tricks and does as he is told without thinking about its consequences. He is impulsive. He is acting like a true moore (or as what people consider him to be) in Shakespeare days. Othello has the tendency to believe whatever Iago tells him. Even before he is shown any evidence to prove that Desdemona is cheating on him. He starts to hate her "Now do I see 'tis true." He turns a blind eye on the fact that he has not seen what the proof is yet. The proof could have been so insignificant that Othello would not trusted it, however in this case the evidence have been planted to mislead Othello. Othello is impulsive. He is rash as fire for numerous reasons. He doesn't trust his wife (who he married with his happiness) ...read more.

Middle

He steals Desdemona's handkerchief and leaves it in Cassio's bedroom. "Such a handkerchief did I see Cassio wipe his beard with". This helps Iago prove Desdemona's infidelity as it will give Othello evidence. "Trifle...are to the jealous confirmation strong as proofs of holy writ". Furthermore, Iago is reticence and implies he is withholding information. He acts like he doesn't want to say anything. "Should you do so...speech should fall in vile success". This entices Othello to say "I pray thee speak to me as to thy thinking". This makes it seem like Iago is trustworthy because he seems to want to protect his friend, when really he wants to get Othello to hate him. "Oft my jealousy shapes faults that are not". Iago start to lie outright. However he only does this after he has largely convinced Othello. He says that he heard Cassio talking to Desdemona in his sleep. "Sweet Desdemona ... let us hide our love". This is a blatant lie but Othello is fooled and believes him. He falls into Iago's trap. It works as he creates hideous images of Cassio and Desdemona. This is when Othello for the first time concludes that Desdemona is 'gone'. His trust and faith in his marital happiness fades into the belief he has been rejected by Desdemona. ...read more.

Conclusion

Such barbarians would react violently, because they were uncivilised. "O blood, blood, blood!" Othello's Moorish heritage may also have influenced his anger at the loss of the handkerchief as he actually believed in its magic. "Tis true. There is a magic in the web of it". Othello having been a soldier since he was 7 and then a general, meaning he spent his life in the army and therefore he didn't know women well. He was also an outsider to the Venetian society and so it made it easier for Iago to convince Othello. "In Venice they do let god see the pranks they do not show their husbands". A number of factors contribute to the killing of Desdemona and Cassio. One of the major reasons influencing Othello's decision is Iago's numerous lies and his way of manipulating and confusing Othello. These play a major part as, if Iago hadn't lied to Othello, he wouldn't have thought his wife betrayed him. Another factor that led to Desdemona's and Cassio's killing is that the fact that in his personal life he knew nothing about women. Iago took advantage of this and lies outright. Iago's lies wouldn't have worked if Othello had trust in him. If divorce was an option he probably would have considered it letting Desdemona live her life. Another reason that Othello was harsh was because that's what moors were considered to be. ?? ?? ?? ?? Mohsina Kantharia 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Othello section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Othello essays

  1. othello. DISCUSS THE DRAMATIC IMPACT OF ACT 1 SCENE 3 AND ITS IMPORTANCE TO ...

    He should also frown with his eyebrows to give the impression that he is thinking of something extraordinarily evil. He should take his time when saying the speech and pause after saying every couple of words making sure that he has emphasised 'his place' and 'How? How? Let me see'.

  2. Analyse the style and structure of Othello, Act 3 scene 3, showing what it ...

    As a result she plans to have it copied and 'giv't Iago' but wonders 'what he will do with it', but her main priority is to please her husbands 'fantasy'. Furthermore, the phrase 'heaven knows not I' is in conjunction with what Iago said earlier on that women only let God see what they dare not show their husbands.

  1. Focusing on Act 3 scene 3, how responsible is Othello for Desdemona's death?

    A Moor, and an officer in the Venetian military. He falls in love with, and marries, the delicate Desdemona, though he is middle-aged, and she is still young. Othello is bold, a good warrior, and a decent person overall; however, he is undone by jealousy and pride, his two main failings.

  2. Discuss and evaluate how Shakespeare uses language to present the character of Othello in ...

    Othello swiftly decides to let Desdemona speak for him knowing she will inform the council of the truth; this is a sure sign of a quick intellectual mind. Desdemona is clearly very much in love with Othello. She is called to court as a witness and is presented with a dilemma.

  1. how iago convinces othello of desdemona's infidelity

    For example in Act 3 Scene 3 Iago states 'I am to pray you not to strain my speech to grosser issues, nor to larger reach than to suspicion.' Iago uses this to really confuse Othello and get him thinking deeply and in many ways about his wife's supposed infidelity and what he should do.

  2. Discuss the dramatic impact of Act 1 Scene 3 and its importance to the ...

    He also describes the Duke in a very positive way; this also shows the change in Othello. The name Desdemona means 'Unhappy' or 'ill fated', and this is exactly what happens to her. At the beginning of the play she is very content, but by the end of the play,

  1. "Othello" act 3, scene 3.

    Othello heard his wife say this, only moments ago, but when Iago says it, it is given a whole new feel and meaning. It is confirming the audience's earlier thoughts and judgements, that Iago had a great way with words and could use them against people in the most malicious ways.

  2. Analyse the dramatic effect of the devices Iago uses in Act III Scene 3 ...

    * Iago plans to persuade Othello that Desdemona and Cassio are more than just friends. There are four main characters in this play, Iago, Desdemona, Cassio and Othello himself. Othello is a man of calm integrity, a dutiful and loving husband who is a pillar of Venetian society.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work