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Explore the relationship between man and the natural world in the opening two Chapters of John Steinbeck(TM)s Of Mice and Men

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Introduction

Explore the relationship between man and the natural world in the opening two Chapters of John Steinbeck's 'Of Mice and Men' In the opening of John Steinbeck's 'Of Mice and Men'. This is focussed on the two random migrant workers, George and Lennie. There goal is to achieve the American dream, they want to get a house, with a few animals. It deals with the plight of migrant labour workers in California during the Great Depression. The themes in the book deal with loneliness isolation, aspiration and escape. One of the themes in the book is the relationship between man and nature, they were forced to their agonised lives by inhospitable nature in the dustbowl, and whilst they are simultaneously reliant upon the land for the pittance they do mange to earn. The land keeps them both servile and alive. Nature is an integral part of the novel. In this essay I will be looking at its roles in the first two chapters. In the opening sequence of the book Steinbeck uses descriptive of the Harmony at night and the language. Words are used like 'Soledad' which means peace. When 'deep and green' is used it is a sense of peacefulness and calmness in the background. ...read more.

Middle

This foreshadows what is to come with Curley's wife. "Lennie dabbled his big paw into the water" this is a barely movement, Lennie is described as a giant but in to the innocence of a child like adult, but he can become powerful and dangerous without knowing it. Lennie is also described as an animal in these paragraphs (a bear and a horse), "Lennie dipped his whole head, hat and all", and it is like and animal fulfilling his needs. The way 'George's' described is more shrew or mouse like "The fisherman, small and .... A thin bony nose" this shows that he is intelligent, sharp and shrewd. George and Lennie are both described as animals, George is described as a fox which represents slyness and Lennie is described as a bear which represents powerfulness and strength. They seem to be in with there natural surroundings. However, when they are in man-made surroundings such as the ranch "wall were white washed and floor unpainted" which is horrible and nature is superior to the ranch, they will also encounter problems not in harmony but nature is preferable. Lennie and George have an American dream, about what they are going to do when they get the money, and who will do what. ...read more.

Conclusion

to some extent, which is the cave for example he says he will live there, and he must go their, he will be fine without George. It also seems to be tranquil and awards the freedom, they don't need to answer too anyone. Their dream is to harness nature and live harmoniously within it. However, there is a sense of underlying threat, the strange noises the animals make, the heron eating the water snake, the 'uncomfortable' sounding simile of the periscope used to describe the snake, and many other dangers that are hidden just waiting to happen. When Lennie does return, George shoots-him not exactly a place of safety though, but h shoots him because he did not want the others to shoot him. Lennie dies whilst visualising the dream and the rabbits, staring into the beautiful brush. Nature somehow comforts him at the time of his death by doing this, but in a way I think he has been conned by George, and nature. He was tricked cruelly and ridiculed him like the gigantic rabbit at the end that speak to him so 'scornfully', but I think it was his destiny that he was meant to die so his dreams could come true and it was George's somehow to get Lennie to live in piece without any violence and danger. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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