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Explore the theme of humanity in the Time Machine noting the effects of social and / or Historical influences.

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Introduction

Explore the theme of humanity in the Time Machine noting the effects of social and / or Historical influences. H.G Wells was born in Bromley Kent on the 21st September 1866. He had attended school called Midhurst Grammar in 1883, soon after he had gone to the normal school of science in London. There he had learned biology, which could lead to why he had written science fiction novels. He had left the school without the qualifications to become a writer. He began his career as a writer in 1893 and then continued to create stories, such as the Time Machine. H.G Wells had studied the fourth dimension as he felt very strongly about this issue. The fourth dimension was about moving back and fourth in time. H.G wells had tried to create his own time machine. He had stated "anyone enters the fourth dimension must have extension". Another way of looking at the fourth dimension is just looking at time. H.G Wells was always looking into the future and had come across many theories which he had expanded on. H.G Wells was attracted to the future. He thought there should be a division, doom and salvation. He had predicted the 20th century precisely; that the streets would be overflowing, a new deadlier weapon of mass destruction would exist and the creation of bigger buildings. H.G Wells had hated the difference between the rich and the poor as he felt that this gap between them was growing. ...read more.

Middle

He noticed big buildings and more people around. "Already I saw other vast shapes - huge buildings with intricate parapets and tall columns, with a wooded hillside dimly creeping in upon me through the lessoning storm" From that quote we can say that H.G Wells's prediction was true about their being more buildings and people. As he continued he noticed things are missing. "Looking round with a sudden thought, from terrace on which I rested for a while, I started to realise that there were no small houses to be seen. Apparently the single house and possibly even the household had vanished. Here and there among the greenery were places like buildings, but the houses and cottage, which form the characteristic features of our own English landscape had disappeared. Communism" As he continues exploring he notices an Eloi drowning and everyone else noticed the Eloi drowning but carried on as if nothing had happened, the time traveller then saves her from drowning. He doesn't understand why they didn't help. The Elois name was Weena, she is the last character in the book to have been named. The time traveller then goes to dinner with the Elois. And sees the Eloi as the culmination of mankind, living in splendour amongst flowery gardens, fountains, and statues. There "were no signs of struggle, neither social nor economical". He found that that Eloi only ate fruit for sustenance, they interacted and slept in large communal halls. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Time Traveller suddenly sees this progression as not the evolution of mankind, but the evolution of class division. He even suggests that such a division is taking place in his time already, stating that: "Even now, does not an East End worker live in such artificial conditions as to be practically cut off from the natural surface of the earth? This suggests that the Time Traveller, a reflection of H.G. Wells, sees class division as something bad, something that could lead to an insurmountable gulf between the rich and poor. The Time Traveller, then, sees the fate of the Eloi and Morlocks as something which could happen (and is starting to happen, in his time) to mankind. They are not fussed about knowledge, which is why they didn't want to learn the English language. The time traveller found this difficult to overcome because in the Victorian times they was accomplishing and trying to discover more. The time traveller then continues travelling into the future, and he could see the earth ending because of the effects of global warming. The global warming had not even been discovered in the Victorian times and yet H.G Wells was thinking forward once again. The time traveller then returns home he won't sit down to dinner with his friends until he has had a wash because in the Victorian times this is what they considered to be in a lower class, not being clean. Throughout this essay I have explored the humanity in the time machine and have related it to the social and historical influences that would have affected H.G Wells at the time it was written. ...read more.

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