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Explore the uses Williams makes of setting, dialogue, stage direction and effects in scene 6

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Introduction

Explore the uses Williams makes of setting, dialogue, stage direction and effects in scene 6 Tennessee Williams is well known for his use of extensive stage directions to set the mood for a scene, and in A Streetcar Named Desire this is particularly obvious in scene six. As most playwrights do, Tennessee Williams introduces the scene with a short description of the area and surroundings of the characters and their positions. His description of the characters goes beyond simple descriptions, suggesting aspects of their personality as well as their moods. For example, he describes Blanche as having 'the utter exhaustion which only a neurasthenic personality can know', this adds to the audiences view of Blanche as it adds to the idea that Blanche's psyche is slowly deteriorating. ...read more.

Middle

She voices her true thoughts, feelings and desires in French as well, she asks Mitch to go to bed with her even though she knows he can't understand, it is obvious that is what she wants but she doesn't want to give him the wrong idea about herself. Blanche has frequent mood swings, as if she can't bear to feel the same thing for a long time as people might think she's boring. This melodramatic personality is shown frequently within the stage directions, though it is sometimes harder to find these examples in the dialogue because it could be performed differently depending on the actress. Blanche changes her mind a lot around Mitch, 'Blanche looks at him gravely; then she bursts into laughter' and 'she rolls her eyes, knowing he cannot see her face' when just recently she had been hanging on his every word. ...read more.

Conclusion

Williams focuses on Mitch's movements and actions to cause the audience to assume his personality before he even speaks, he creates an awkward but honest personality in Mitch. When he enters, Mitch isn't portrayed as an elegant creature like Blanche, 'Mitch is bearing, upside down, a plaster statuette of Mae West', as he is holding it upside down this makes him seem clumsy. There is also an innocent side in his actions, one which is reminiscent of a small shy child, 'he clears his throat twice, shuffling nervously'. Williams could be trying to get the audiences sympathy for Mitch and also he shows the contrast between him and Blanche. Alludes Streetcar named desire Dialogue more ...read more.

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