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Explore the way in which Arthur Miller presents justice in 'A View From The Bridge'. How could the characters' search for justice and the feeling that the law is some how inadequate be on stage?

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Introduction

Explore the way in which Arthur Miller presents justice in 'A View From The Bridge'. How could the characters' search for justice and the feeling that the law is some how inadequate be on stage? ''A View From The Bridge'' by Arthur Miller is a dramatic and moving play, which results in tragedy. The themes concerning this playwright are an unnatural love, poverty, family relationships, loyalty, justice, respect and power law, illegal immigration and above all fate. The setting is mainly in an apartment beside a bridge. Eddie Carbone is a longshoreman working on the docks of New York, His wife is Beatrice and her niece is Catherine. After a few episodes, Beatrice's cousins enter illegally into America. They are two brothers Marco and Rodolfo. Alfieri is another character involving two important roles; he plays in chorus as a narrator and a lawyer in the play. Eddie Carbone has a longing for a love for Catherine that he cannot have and has acknowledged it properly until the two Italian illegal immigrants have his house as a hiding base. In 'A View From The Bridge', justice is a predominant theme that the law is somehow inadequate. Eddie at first breaks the law for harbouring illegal immigrants but tries to search for a law to go against these immigrants when he finds out about Catherine and Rodolfo. He is a hypocrite as well as a tragic protagonist and Catherine (who he has an unnatural love for) together with Rodolfo is a big obstacle for him to overcome. Unfortunately his determination leads him to make things worse for himself. Characters in 'A View From The Bridge' portray different attitudes and approaches to law and justice. ...read more.

Middle

Marco does not voice his thoughts to anyone but warns Eddie by his body language and facial expressions to retreat. This is specifically shown when Marco poses the chair threateningly above Eddie's head at the end of Act One. And he transforms what might glare like a glare of warning into a smile of triumph and Eddie's grin vanishes as he absorbs this look. (Act One) This daring attitude of Marco towards Eddie shows that he has more power and is much more justified than Eddie in demanding vengeance and above all justice. In this episode Eddie satisfies part of his anger by hitting Rodolfo, but is soon shattered when Marco poses himself a threat to him by holding a chair above his head and showing his physical strength and inward determination. Marco glares out a warning and as Eddie realizes this, his ''grin vanishes'', which makes Marco content that Eddie has got the hint which can be seen when he ''smiles in triumph''. It can be dramatically sensed that Marco is victorious and knows that Eddie has got the message to leave Rodolfo alone. Marco makes the audience and particularly Eddie to realize that if Eddie wants to do something to Rodolfo he has to deal with himself (Marco) first. This causes a lot of tension between Marco and Eddie because of Marco being self-satisfied and superior and making Eddie look small and powerless. Eddie and Marco are both Italian but Marco is more familiar to the culture and background of his country, therefore shares the same characteristics, such as being hot-tempered, industrious, respectful, grateful and above all, taking justice very seriously. ...read more.

Conclusion

At the beginning of Act One all the character have no awareness of the law. They do what is considerably right as long as it fits in with the 'Family law'. Eddie breaks the law for harbouring illegal immigrants but then goes to search for a law to go against them. When he fails to do so, he 'snitches' and breaks the family regulations. This showed that Eddie is a hypocrite and a fraud. Arthur Miller uses law in these cases to create dramatic tension between characters like Eddie and the brothers. Alfieri is presented as a lawyer who clarifies what the law is and that Eddie is after a law that is inactive. 'A View From The Bridge' is a tragedy, which results in murder. One way in which the Audience are shown this is when Alfiery declares: Eddie Carbone never expected to have destiny. (Act Two) Here, Alfieri gives us a big clue because it instantly prepares the audience that Eddie was bound to have a fatal end and it was something neither the family expected. The ending is quite appropriate to the rest of the play by Eddie making so much worse for himself gradually that he caused his own death and Marco achieving what he wanted. Eddie could be highlighted as a tragic hero as some of his actions were heroic. He made many assumptions, protected, and took care of Catherine like his own daughter. The drawback of his attitude towards Catherine was that he over protected her and with this obsessive nature she was smothered, which proved non-heroic qualities. Eddie could also be seen as a tragic protagonist from wanting everything to getting nothing as he is seen him falling to his knees in front of the whole neighbourhood. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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