• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explore the way that Shakespeare uses Deception in the Play 'Much Ado About Nothing'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explore the way that Shakespeare uses Deception in the Play 'Much Ado About Nothing' In the Play 'Much Ado About Nothing' the role of deceit is an important one that is played to its fullest. The play is based upon deliberate deceptions and numerous schemes that are used to manipulate the thoughts of nearly every character and the characters deceive themselves by putting on a different public facade instead of showing their true feelings and personalities. The play also involves an elaborate arrangement of trickery to achieve a humorous effect that perhaps portrays deceit as something that is not necessarily corrupt, but rather as a means to an end. The first example of deception in Act 1, involves Beatrice and Benedick. Although the main plot focuses on the drama between Claudio and Hero, Beatrice and Benedick are vital characters that provide some of the wittiest dialogue in the play. They are more worldly and both of them protest that they never intend to marry. This makes the audience enjoy even more, their rapid acceptance of each other's affection when they are tricked into falling in love with each other. In the opening scene, Beatrice begins a sequence of insults by asking Benedick why he is talking as no one listens to him. He responds "Lady Disdain! Are you yet living?" and she replies by asking how could such disdain die when Benedick is there to feed it? ...read more.

Middle

This makes Claudio feel 'something of a jealous complexion' and infuriated with Don Pedro. However, as soon as Den Pedro announces 'Here, Claudio, I have wood in thy name and fair Hero is won' Claudio does not even question Don Johns motive or intentions. This gives the audience a better knowledge of the character and helps the audience to understand the way he acts when he is told of Hero's infidelity later in the play. In Act Two, out of pure amusement Don Pedro asks Leonato and Claudio to assist him in bringing Beatrice and Benedick together, 'If we can do this Cupid is no longer an archer and the glory shall be ours'. Claudio, Leonato and Don Pedro notice Benedick in the garden an attempt to trick him into falling for Beatrice. The three men do this by loudly discussing Beatrice's unrequited love towards him and in his eavesdropping, he believes them and shows his feelings in his soliloquy. 'This can be no trick . . . I will be horribly in love with her.' Benedick realises that he loves Beatrice also when he says 'Why, it must be requited.' In Act Three, Hero, Margaret and Ursula perform the same trick on Beatrice to make her fall in love with Benedick. They speak highly of Benedick 'praise him more than ever man did merit' and say that 'Benedick loves Beatrice so entirely'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Friar Francis suggests that 'Let her a while be secretly kept in, and publish it that she is dead indeed' to make Claudio feel guilty and realise his mistake. This is an essential part of the play because otherwise Claudio would continue to believe that Hero was 'a rotten orange' and her reputation would be ruined. In Act 5 the final example of deception in the play is yet again conducted against Claudio. After Claudio has been told of Hero's innocence he feels a vast amount of remorse. And asks Leonato to 'Impose me to what penance your invention, Can lay upon my sin.' To which he replies that as 'you could not be my son-in-law, Be yet my nephew: my brother hath a daughter'. Leonato proposes that Claudio marries Antonio's daughter as a way of redeeming himself, although it is Hero that will marry him. At the wedding the women come out wearing masks to hide their identities, believing that he is about to wed Antonio's daughter, Claudio asks 'Sweet, let me see your face'. This is a great scene because it builds up excitement within the audience, as they know that Hero will be the one to marry him instead. When Hero unmasks, Claudio is overjoyed to witness 'another Hero!' In 'Much Ado About Nothing' deception is used tactfully to manipulate the thoughts of nearly every character. It is ironic and a comical essential in the play that nearly every character is too distracted by trying to deceive other characters to realise that they are being deceived themselves. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Much Ado About Nothing section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Much Ado About Nothing essays

  1. How does Shakespeare present Deception in the play?

    I do not like her'. From the description he gives, he has obviously studied her in considerable detail. His friends are really making fun of him. Claudio's reply shows completely he is later deceived over the plot about Hero. Here he is all praises: 'a modest young lady', it does

  2. How Shakespeare portrays Hero and Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing.

    no say because she is consider a procession of her fathers rather than a person who can express her feelings freely. Hero is also portrayed as one of the romantic characters in the play, as during the party in Act II scene I she is quickly 'wooed' by Don Pedro

  1. Discuss how Shakespeare creates the character of Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing

    the end, so the ending would not surprise them as much today's audience. But why does Benedick show so much detestation towards Beatrice? This scene only shows the audience Benedick's and Beatrice's present relationship but if the reader studies this scene carefully, they can gather enough information to explain why they are like this.

  2. Shakespeare's 'Much Ado About Nothing' Consider the various forms of deception, which an audience ...

    From start to finish he acts as a brooding threatening presence. This is where; with a huge amount of help for Borachio he plans to show Margaret acting as Hero being unfaithful to Claudio before the marriage therefore being a 'contaminated stale'.

  1. How does Shakespeare reveal Claudio's character to the audience through his use of language ...

    Imagery is used when Claudio says 'Give not this rotten orange to your friend' this is used to show his feelings for Hero are non existent and does not what to marry Hero any more. When Claudio say 'rotten orange ' he is insulting Hero as he is saying that

  2. Discuss the character and role of Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing. What do ...

    The hiding of her feelings with this apparent facade made by Beatrice is removed when the others trick her into thinking Benedick loves her. Benedick: Do not you love me? Beatrice: Why no; no more than reason Benedick: Why then your uncle, the Prince and Claudio have been deceived; they swore you did.

  1. English A discussion of the way William Shakespeare presents the changing character of Benedick ...

    Benedick then later on describes himself as a "professed tyrant" meaning that he is admitting to himself that he is a misogynist. A misogynist is someone who sees men as being more superior to women; he proudly confesses this, trying to show everyone that he does not love any woman.

  2. In 'Much Ado About Nothing' deception

    His plan works up until Don Pedro tells him the truth which shows how detached Don John is and that he would have to do a lot more to break a friendship or as we later find out that he has to deceive more people than just Claudio.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work