• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explore the ways in which Romeo and Mercutio are presented in Act 2 Scene 4 and in elsewhere in the play and in the performed version.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Romeo and Juliet Draft ________________ Explore the ways in which Romeo and Mercutio are presented in this scene and elsewhere in the play and in the performed version. Act 2 Scene 4 is a significant scene because it is the comic climax in the play where witty banter takes place, which is the first but also the last collision of the two humorous characters, Romeo and Mercutio, before the play descends into tragedy. Here Mercutio meets the climax of his bawdy style and low humour by using lots of sexual jokes, providing a continued counter-point to the elevated style and language of love of Romeo and Juliet in Act Two Scene Two. More importantly, Act Two Scene Four is a key scene which moves the plot forward. By learning about Tybalt?s challenge, the audience will know that this will be the catalyst for the subsequent tragedy. Moreover, the scene is a reminder of the backdrop of the Capulet and Montague feud in case the audience had got carried away by the romance of the young Romeo and Juliet. I will be mainly investigating Act Two Scene Four in the play, Romeo and Juliet, to explore how Romeo and Mercutio are presented. ...read more.

Middle

Contrary to what Mercutio says in Act 1 Scene 4: ?Romeo! Humours! Madman! Passion! Lover!?, which suggests that there is a certain distance between Romeo and Mercutio?s relationships as he makes fun of Romeo?s ?love melancholy? ;their friendship is at its peak in Act 2 Scene 4, as revealed by the bantering stichomythia. This is important for developing the audience?s sense of their close relationship and providing a catalyst for subsequent tragedy. In Act 2 Scene 4, Shakespeare uses Benvolio to introduce a note of caution, which is revealed when he says ?Stop there, stop there.? to warn Mercutio not to go too far with his sexual jokes. Shakespeare constructs Benvolio as a voice of caution and warning, which is also shown in Act 3 Scene 1 as he says ?If we meet we shall not scape a brawl, for now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring.? to Mercutio, foreshadowing that Mercutio may ?go too far? and causes tragedy. In addition, Shakespeare characterises the nurse as slow-witted and easily confused by Mercutio, as evidenced by her reply to Mercutio?s mocking of her, saying ?If you be he, sir, I desire some confidence with you.? after Mercutio says?Yea, is the worst well? ...read more.

Conclusion

Mercutio?s comedy scenes, especially Act 2 Scene 4 where he meets his comic climax, evolve intense pathos for his death in Act 3 Scene 1 as well. Therefore, their friendship is very important to the whole play. Overall, although there are a few adjustments in both Luhrmann and Zeffirelli performed versions, Romeo is mainly presented as a romantic and serious person, juxtaposing with Mercutio, who is changeable, mocking and not serious about love. Their close friendship is suggested in both film versions. The only key difference is the character of the Nurse, who is presented as high-status in Luhrmann version but low-status and slow-witted in Zeffirelli version. As a whole, it is obvious that Act 2 Scene 4 is presented similarly in Shakespeare?s version and both performed versions because this scene is very important to the play. The close relationship between Romeo and Mercutio is required as a catalyst for the subsequent tragedy. Also, Act 2 Scene 4 is the last scene of comedy before the play descends into the tragedy. More importantly, a comedy scene is needed as a contrast with the romance scene when Romeo discusses with the Nurse about the marriage with Juliet, which highlights the seriousness of Romeo?s love to Juliet in Act 2 Scene 4: ?Commend me to thy lady and mistress. I protest unto thee-? To Tsz Ching 11P ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. Romeo and Juliet. Mercutio is the only character, who brings action and comedy ...

    "I pray thee, good Mercutio, let's retire: the day is hot, the Capulet's abroad. And, if we meet, we shall not escape a brawl" In this quotation Benvolio begs Mercutio to go home. Benvolio is worried, that if they meet the Capulet's, there will definitely be a fight between them.

  2. Choose two scenes from "Romeo and Juliet" and comment on how Zeffirelli and Luhrmann ...

    This draws attention to the negative aspects of the scene, which go unnoticed in many other versions of the play as it is widely regarded as purely a love scene. Another way in which Luhrmann interprets this scene as his own is through the art of visual metaphor, for example props, costume and depictions of the natural elements.

  1. Compare how Romeo is presented in Act I scene I and Act II scene ...

    This is then further emphasised by Romeo's attempt to try and describe his feelings for Rosaline. For example Romeo implies his feelings as ' cold fire, sick health, still waking sleep.' these consecutive oxymoron's demonstrate Romeo's clich�d view of love, which is clearly an exaggeration of love itself.

  2. How is the character of Romeo presented in Romeo and Juliet?

    For someone who proclaims that he is so in love with Rosaline, Romeo does not speak of her often - unless in direct reference to himself. This point that Romeo is not thinking all that much about Rosaline at all is supported by line 172, when he says "Where shall we dine?"

  1. What is important to Shakespeare in his construction of selected scenes from 'Romeo and ...

    Two servants of Montague enter and Sampson bites his thumb at Abraham. In Shakespeare's time biting your thumb at someone is the equivalent to sticking up your middle finger in present day times. Benvolio then enters and briefly stops the fight although the peace does not last as Tybalt enters and it starts again.

  2. Comparisons between Baz Luhrmann and Zeferelli versions of Romeo and Juliet

    For example, Juliet wears white and is dressed as an angel to show her virginity and innocence. Romeo is dressed as a knight to signify that he is Juliet's knight in shining armour. Alternatively, the costumes are less obvious and don't show the characters personalities as much in Zeferelli's version.

  1. I was confused at first when I watched Luhrman's version, as he has swapped ...

    Juliet is not a replacement, the love she shares with Romeo is far deeper, more authentic, and unique than the cliched puppy love Romeo felt for Roseline. Romeo's deep capacity for love is merely a part of his larger capacity for intense feeling of all types/kinds.

  2. Jonathan Tindall10x1 Final Draft

    This would show the great luxury's he can afford. The colours I would use for him would deep purple's and red's and possibly with gold patterns running along the hem of his gowns to show his immense wealth. This would illustrate a great image of royalty and power.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work