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Explore the ways in which the narrative of 'The Necklace' contributes to the effectiveness of the story's ending.

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Introduction

The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant Explore the ways in which the narrative of 'The Necklace' contributes to the effectiveness of the story's ending. The title of this story tells us little about what will be happening in this story. From that we would only be able to predict that the story would involve a necklace. Everything other than that remains a mystery. A short and simple title in this case has attracted the reader to read on. This is achieved because with this kind of short title, as it brings limited information about the story itself, the only way the reader could know about the content would be to read onwards. "The Necklace" has been effective by the way it brings to the reader the sense of pity for Mme Loisel. The author used the plot, character, setting, point of view and the theme of the story to achieve this. At the beginning of the story, Mme Loisel and her husband are presented as poor figures. Mme Loisel longed for a rich and decent life. In her dreams she dreamt of being admired, living in a house with big reception halls with fashionable dinner parties being held. All of these would surely not come true. This opening of the story is very normal. ...read more.

Middle

This was just with a very limited description; the author didn't go in great details. This is when the whole story started to come out clearer. The day of the party came. As expected, she wore her new evening dress and the diamond necklace that she borrowed. It was a gorgeous evening for her; she has attracted all the men in that party including the minister. Up until now, everything seemed to go right but it was when Mme Loisel and her husband returned home that the nightmare began. The necklace was lost; Mme Loisel and her husband tried their best to search for the necklace but to no avail. The irony twists was brought up here in this part of the story. The reader here would think that after the party, Loisel's life would have become rich. With the lost of the necklace, the whole mind of becoming rich suddenly dropped. The atmosphere sounded as if something terrible would be happening. All of a sudden, this impulsive change made the story more interesting. In this part of the story, it is also clear of why the title "The Necklace" has been given to the story. ...read more.

Conclusion

This details of how Loisels went into the hardship was depicted excessively in the story: "signed notes...ran the whole gamut of moneylenders...compromised the rest of his life...risked his signature...terrified by the outlook for the future...blackness of despair...tortures of the spirit." The effectiveness of the story also lies in the point of view behind the story using a third person to focus on Mathilde's thoughts and responses because we as readers do not know until the end of the story that Mme Forestier always knew that the necklace was only made from paste, which is a bright but cheap glass. This was shown in Mme Forestier's speech at the last paragraph "But mine was only paste. Why at most it was worth only five hundred francs!" Last but not least, the author added the impact of the work to contribute to the effectiveness of the story's ending too by generally making the reader feel pity for the foolishness of Mme Loisel, who thought a twist of fate and losing true worth by pursuing simple appearances. This has been brought out in the story by questioning that "What would happened if she had not lost that necklace? Who knows? Who can say?" and also by saying that "How little there is between happiness and misery!" By Patrick Wong ...read more.

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