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Explore the ways in which William Golding establishes the setting of the novel in Chapter 1 of " Lord of the flies".

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Introduction

Explore the ways in which William Golding establishes the setting of the novel in Chapter 1 of " Lord of the flies" In establishing the setting of the novel, the author focuses upon the geographical elements of the island together with dialogue between the various characters, which reveals events and details about the setting of the story. With regards to the geographical setting, after analysing the chapter in thorough detail, it is clear that Golding uses effective language throughout the chapter to describe the island as an apparent paradise. He emphasizes the fact that one character in particular seems to relate to the situation as if it were his childhood dream" the fair boy said this solemnly; but then the delight of a realised ambition overcame him." The language, in which the author continuously uses in descriptions of the island, suggests the sense of paradise, "it was clear to the bottom and bright with the efflorescence of tropical weed and coral, a school of tiny flickering fish flicked hither and thither. He further substantiates upon this with a reaction of a character "Ralph spoke to himself, sounding the bass strings of delight." ...read more.

Middle

The sound of the conch over the island, attracting every child to one place could be described as ominous, however, the sound of the conch alone demonstrates a sinister atmosphere. The main way in which Golding puts across the sinister feeling is by referring to darkness "within the diamond haze of the beach something dark was fumbling along." Giving an unpleasant image and a eerie feeling. The very last page of the chapter reflects the most sinister part of the chapter, this being when they find a pig. They are at the beginnings of thick forest when "they heard the noises - squeakings - and the hard strike hoofs on a path." Once they find the pig the author relates to it as it being " caught on the curtains of creepers, throwing itself at the elastic traces in all the madness of extreme terror." this gives a sinister, scary feeling and a sense of the unknown. This idea, in which the author has included, puts across this feeling to the reader to capture the interest and ensure that they are feeling the sinister emotion as well as the paradise side of the island. ...read more.

Conclusion

He then goes onto say " I saw the other part of the plane. There were flames coming out of it" Piggy also reveals that there was a storm and this may be the way in which the plane suddenly disappeared- through the storm dragging it out to sea. The author may have wanted to slowly reveal the main events through dialogue to create atmosphere, suspense and reality to the situation or to demonstrate how the characters feel about the situation. These all being valid and perfectly understandable reasons for the effects of revelation through dialogue to the reader. In conclusion after fully analysing the text of chapter one and considering the chronological and geographical aspects, it is clear that the author has effectively opened the novel with a clear image of all areas of the setting through different ways. These being the dialogue, a contrast of a paradise island to a more sinister side, along with the language which has been successfully used to create an incredibly clear image in which the reader can use to understand the novel in a more enhanced manner. ...read more.

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