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Explore the ways Mary Shelley presents the character of the monster in "Frankenstein?"

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Introduction

James Scott English Essay Explore the ways Mary Shelley presents the character of the monster in "Frankenstein?" Frankenstein is a gothic novel written in the 19th Century. It is a mixture of romance and horror. In Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein" the monster is presented in several ways. Before we see the creation we are given information, which prepares us for the horror and destruction that the monster carries out. The reader's initial reaction is that this monster will be a rotting corpse created from leftovers from slaughterhouses, morgues and graves. We can gather from this that he will be very tall, ugly and will be very repellent and terrifying. The reader during the 1800's would have been shocked at the idea of resurrecting a corpse thrown together with some cotton and to be re-animated by electricity. Victor Frankenstein thought the creation of the monster out thoroughly but after his resurrection his future life was not considered. Victor Frankenstein became so obsessed with being a romantic hero he forgot what the monster's needs would be. During chapter four the creature is created and is immediately rejected by Victor his creator/father. ...read more.

Middle

The monster thinks that if he can't see him he will not be prejudiced. The creature goes to the cottage door and knocks. The old man lets him in and the conversation is going well. Unfortunately, before the monster can hide back in his hovel the family returns and fearing their Fathers safety they beat the monster, because of his huge deformities. Once again a family he thought he could trust has rejected the monster. "A fatal prejudiced clouds their eyes." Mary Shelly creates this twist in the story to make us feel more sorrow for the monster. Rejected and lonely the monster discovers Victor's journal and begins to read of his own birth. The monster discovers his Father was from Geneva and decides to go and confront his creator. He wants to know why he has been left alone in the world. Finishing reading the journal he curses Victor. "Cursed creator, why did you form a monster so hideous." On his way to Geneva he saves a girl from drowning in the river rapids. The monster trying to act as a romantic hero dives into the rapids and rescues the girl, but once again because of his deformities he is attacked by the father of the girl and is chased and chased. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the end of their epic chase Victor is too weak to survive and 'the monster' not wishing to harm anyone else, throws himself onto the funeral pyre. Earlier the monster is seen weeping at the foot of the bed of Victor. This is hardly surprising as Victor is effectively his Father. Captain Walton considers the tragedy of the two men's lives and decides to give up his own obsession of reaching the North Pole by boat and turns around and heads for home in England, learning from the mistakes of Victor Frankenstein. A reader, during the 1800's would react to Shelly's monster differently to a reader during the 21st Century. Advances in medicine mean some of what Frankenstein achieved is now possible. The behaviour of the monster is understandable as the brain is taken from a murderer and would, in theory; react, as it would have done when originally alive. The monster seems to take on the worst of Victor and as his 'child' is influenced by the way others he comes into contact with treat him not only by Victor but also. The final rejection by Victor of the monster makes the monster even worse and even angrier and more frustrated than he was before. He did not ask to be created and is trapped within a world that will not accept him. ...read more.

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