• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explore the ways that Shakespeare shows different types of love in Twelfth Night.(TM)

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explore the ways that Shakespeare shows different types of love in 'Twelfth Night.' In the play Twelfth Night, Shakespeare covers four main types of love. Love is defined as a strong affection or liking for someone. The four types of love Shakespeare shows in this play are lust, true love, friendship love and familial love. Love is one of the most confusing emotions that humans possess. It is a diverse emotion and that is why it is used as a main theme in this play. Lust, which is one of the most confusing types of love, is very commonly used in the play Twelfth Night. The meaning of lust is that one person is attracted to another person for their looks or money or any other aspect of that person. Shakespeare shows lust in the play between the characters Orsino and Olivia. Even though Orsino had not yet properly met Olivia, he still believed that he was madly in love with her. Lust is defined as an intense but temporary wanting of a person's attention or love. Orsino only lusts after Olivia for a temporary period of time; he tries to capture the heart of Olivia throughout the play and lusts for her because he is attracted by her grieving for her family. ...read more.

Middle

Viola hints at her feelings for Orsino throughout the play. 'A blank, my lord. She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm I' th' bud, Feed on her damask cheek. She pin'd in thought' (II.iv.l.112) This speech is very ironic as Orsino does not realise here that Viola is actually talking about her own feelings for him. Shakespeare uses the metaphor 'like a worm I'th' bud' to show how Viola feels. It explains that concealing her feelings is destroying her like a bud that destroys a rose. Although it is destroying her she mentions that she is still 'smiling at grief' (II.iv.l.116) because she loves truly and deeply and is willing to sacrifice herself for love. Orsino carried on speaking of his love for Olivia making Viola want to tell Orsino that she herself is in love with him. In the final scene Viola reveals herself as a woman. Orsino tells Viola that from now on she shall be her 'master's mistress.' (V.i.l.319) As she was disguised as a man, Viola and Orsino had a very good friendship, which meant the switch to husband and wife was made very easy. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is demonstrated by Viola over the death of her twin brother. She truly mourns the death of Sebastian, and takes on his appearance not only to help her survive in this foreign land, but also so that she may keep some aspect of her brother close to her. Viola's love for Sebastian is shown mainly at the beginning of the play, in Act I Scene ii. Her first thoughts after the shipwreck are of her brother. She refuses to believe that he is 'drown'd' (I.ii.l.5). Familial love is also shown through the character of Olivia as she mourns for her brother. She makes a declaration of her lost brothers' death by saying she will have no visitors, she turns people away claiming that it is for her 'brother's death' (I.v.l.65) that she wants no visitors. She refuses to think about the idea of love and marriage as she loved her brother very much and all her emotion is going to her brother. Love plays a major role in Twelfth Night, and Shakespeare addresses the ideas of lust, true love, friendship love and familial love in very clever and interesting way. In this play Shakespeare shows love as more then just love shared between two people romantically, but also shows it as the love between friends and family. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Twelfth Night section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Twelfth Night essays

  1. Discuss the different types of love presented in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.

    In scene three we are introduced to Sir Andrew, Maria and Sir Toby who complains that Olivia's mourning for her brother prevents all enjoyment. Sir Toby is a great juggler with words, even when he's drunk. When he's describing Sir Andrew his description of him is full of mockery (he says something when he means something else).

  2. How does Shakespeare explore the theme of love in Twelfth Night(TM)?

    Olivia is more than happy to exchange her 'love' for a fake man, Viola, for that of a real one in Sebastian, whom she has known for mere minutes. She fell in love with Viola's personality, but settles for Sebastian because of their similar appearance.

  1. Twelfth Night has been described as a play of contrast-light and darkness; humour and ...

    "And on that vice in him will my revenge find notable cause to work". They pick out each others flaws and use it to their advantage to make the revenge work. This is one of the many dark moments in the play that changes the mood of the play, from humorous love story, to a dark menacing plot.

  2. Discuss the similarities and differences between Olivia and Viola in "Twelfth Night".

    herself as a means of survival, illustrates that in fact they are not. However, as the play progresses, a great deal more of her favourable characteristics become apparent. She, like Viola, is intelligent and proves herself to be adaptable in her dealings with other members of the household - she

  1. Examine the ways in which Shakespeare creates comedy for the audience in Act 3 ...

    Sir Toby provides a glimpse of his intentions early on when talking to Maria about Sir Andrew- he states that Aguecheek "has three thousand ducats a year" and "he's a fool." However, Sir Andrew is actually not as wealthy as he seems due to Sir Toby leeching money out of

  2. A close, critical analysis of Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night' with regard to relating a particular ...

    Finally, as I mentioned above, not only do these last lines link the passage back on itself, they link it with the rest of the play - through the play's two most important themes - love and madness. These two powerful ideas are reflected on throughout most of the play,

  1. The most perceptive characters in Twelfth Night are the best at fooling others. How ...

    They remain misled, unwitting, by the rest of the cast until the revelation at the end of the play. Maria and Sir Toby are the orchestrators of the antics surrounding Malvolio and Sir Andrew in Twelfth Night. They are a rarity in Shakespeare's works; few Shakespearean couples seem to be

  2. A joyful fantasy full of impossibilities. To what extent is this a true description ...

    ?So full of shapes is fancy?, Orsino continues , relating all the many things that love swallows up to loves power to be imaginative and fantastical. He is portraying that your mind is so occupied by love that everything that used to matter no longer does.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work