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Falling Down is a film about a man who we know very little about (at the start) apparently trying to get home to see his family, it is his little girls birthday

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Falling Down Falling Down is a film about a man who we know very little about (at the start) apparently trying to get home to see his family, it is his little girls birthday. The film opens with the camera coming out of his mouth and showing his face then the rest of his body, you notice that he is wearing a white shirt and tie. It then moves around the scene showing you that he is very hot and stuck in a traffic jam, it shows the people in the cars around him, and his reactions to these people. One of the more striking reactions is to a group of black kids in a bus with an American flag on the side. The camera moves around the scene more and comes to show you that the number plate of his car is D-FENS, this tell you a lot about the character, that he probably works for the defence industry, he is a military man, patriotic and well disciplined. As the music in the background gets more intense you can see the anxiety and the feeling of being trapped growing on his face, this, and the music is suddenly relived when he jumps out of his car and walks away from the traffic jam with nothing but his briefcase. It is at this point that the other main character is introduced, an old stereotypical good cop called Vandergas, the good guy. ...read more.


This makes the reader think he is down on his luck and maybe he is just snapping under the pressure, like in the store. Whilst he is sitting here two young Mexicans approach him and tell him that this is their hill and they don't accept trespassers, he replies by using street slang like "oh I'm sorry I've wondered onto your patch and now I've messed with your posy" this is delivered with a patronising tone, you can tell that he doesn't like them this may be racist or maybe that they are immigrants and they are degrading the country, he doesn't like them because if the way they are stereotyped and their aggressive behaviour towards him. Again like in the shop the Mexican ma is talking to him and he replies with "Speak English I may be able to understand you if you speak English!" The other man tries to take his briefcase and threatens him with a knife, but "D-fens" reverses it and knocks him back with the bat he took from the Korean shopkeeper he than turns round and knocks the other one down the steps leading to the hill, here again he shows his temper and appeals to people who are like him, middle aged white people who have encountered people of this nature, they would of wanted to teach them a lesson as well. He is doing what the reader says they will do. ...read more.


So far in the film most of the codes of narrative have been used, Action in the sequences with the drive by and in the shop. Enigma, with the situation between him and his wife, and also about his name. Symbolic, at the start of the film there were symbols of Americanisation in peoples cars, one had a Garfield toy stuck to the window, and in the corner shop he bought a can of Coke without even thinking about it. Cultural, in the film so far he has met many different cultures. These are all part of one enigma code, does he like other cultures? The main character has also been very easy to relate to, he does all the things we would like to do but would never have the guts to do, a classic example of this is a bit later in the film where he complains to the staff in a fast food restaurant about the quality of the burger he gets in comparison to the picture of the burger on the wall. This is meant to make the audience like him and slightly warp his character on one hand he is a maniac with a bag full of guns, but on the other he is jut an average man who is just trying to get home. This causes mixed feelings for the audience, they don't know if they should like or dislike him, which you will do depending upon the type of social class that you are and how he treats that class in the film. ...read more.

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