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Fear as the Root of Trouble.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Fear as the Root of Trouble Aman Nijjar ENG 3U K. Rastin July 14, 2003 In the novel the Lord of the Flies, written by William Golding, fear is the cause of all of the problems that take place on the island. At first, the island is thought to be splendid and a paradise, but as the boys' stay on the island increases, so, too, do their fears. The boys soon become afraid of each other and soon after that the boys break up and fight because of the fear. The boys' original fears are of what they think are beasts. "Then people started getting frightened" (Golding, 88). This was spoken by Ralph at an assembly because he knew that things were breaking up and he also knew why. It was the fear. In the novel the Lord of the Flies, fear is the root of the trouble that is caused on the island. ...read more.

Middle

Fear causes the boys on the island to break up and to fight. At first, everything is great; there are rules that are being followed and the boys are having fun. Then a beast is mentioned and the boys' fears surface. At first, there are arguments about if there even is a beast. This causes arguments and some tension between Jack and Ralph. Jack states that he will hunt and kill the beast, but Ralph keeps arguing that there is none (35). When it is proven that there is a beast on the mountain, that is when things go very bad. Jacks says that Ralph stayed behind on the mountaintop while he and Roger went ahead (139). This showed cowardice and Jack thinks that he should become the leader; the boys once again vote for Ralph and Jack leaves the group angrily. Soon all of the boys leave the group to join Jack except for the twins, Piggy and Jack himself. ...read more.

Conclusion

Once again, all of the boys are afraid. When the twins, Samneric, see a beast sitting on top of the mountain and Ralph, Jack and Roger confirm what the twins saw, there is complete fear. No one is willing to walk alone or even to go deep into the forests, except for Simon. The boys are terrified and this is when Nijjar 4 things start to break up. Now, the fear moves on from what they think is the beast to something much more dangerous. Now, they are afraid of each other. At first the island is thought to be a paradise by the boys. It is a dream come true. The boys are living every child's fantasy. Then things start to go horribly wrong. Fear sets in. In this novel, William Golding illustrates that fear is everywhere and can wreak havoc on many things. In this case the boys become afraid of each other and for all of them survival becomes impossible. They eventually they realize that dreams can easily turn into nightmares. ...read more.

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